Acidic conditions accelerating corrosion? (1 Viewer)

Kimyia

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Someone please help! I'm so confused.
I know acidic conditions accelerate the rate of corrosion but I don't quite understand why.

Is it because of this reaction:
Fe(s) + 2H+ -> Fe2+ + H2(g)
And because you have Fe2+, it will go on to react with something else and hence has corroded.

Or, is it because of this reaction:
O2(g) + 4H+ + 4e- -> 2H2O(l)
and because it has a higher reduction potential than the other equation (O2(g) + 2H2O + 4e- -> 4OH- ) it will occur preferentially and so the presence of H+ accelerates the rate of corrosion because the reaction is more likely to occur.

Or it is partly because of both reasons? Or is it none of these reasons and its something completely different? ahaha

Thank you to anyone who can help :)
 
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golgo13

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I'll take a stab at it, (haven't done ship wrecks for a year so bear with me)
Pretty sure you have to combine the 2 equations you mentioned above to get a more definitive answer, acid has the ability to accelerate the corrosion because of the H+ ions it gives out. If you look at the first equation above when iron is rusting or or changeing to the ionic form it due to the H+ equation, which can normally be supplememnted with water and some oxygen. By providing another source of H+ ions you are prodviding more H+ an therefore accelerating the normal rusting process but you would use both equations to explain
I hope that helps :)
 

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