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Do i need to do highschool economics to do well in economics in university? (1 Viewer)

stopcrying

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Basically i just want some personal experience from someone with good knowledge of economics in university. I'm quite interested in it especially the mathematical side and i regret not doing it for my senior years.

Just wanted to know, how troubling will i find it if i have no knowledge of high school economics?
 

Zoinked

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My friend does economics at uni after having only done general maths and no economics and he's doing great and loving it. I suggest you do learn the basic concepts of economics on khan academy to gauge if economics is what you want to study. https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain. I haven't done the whole khan academy economics course but i'm sure it will catch you up to a great level to study econ at uni.
 

si2136

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Make sure you like Economics first. Read some lecture slides on Econometrics then.
 

sida1049

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While HSC economics would help, it is far from being essential.

Mathematics, however, is very important. Particularly if you are planning to major in economics (and even more if you pursue honours and/or postgraduate research).

While some people may manage with just general maths, I would strongly advise against it. Generally the more comfortable with mathematics you are, the more accommodating studying economics at university will be. Too many people develop the perception that economics in uni is like that of economics in the HSC (i.e. lots of rote learning, memorising, wish-washy explanations and no maths at all [though to be fair, there are political economy majors, but honestly I'd view that more as a history/politics program than a proper rigorous economics program]), and end up doing badly or barely passing first year economics (USYD's introductory microeconomics course has a 20% failure rate because people can't understand the maths [which in itself isn't difficult, but confidence in understanding mathematical expressions and equations is something many students lack]).
 
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sida1049

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Make sure you like Economics first. Read some lecture slides on Econometrics then.
I'd actually disagree with this one. A fresh Year 12 attempting to read slides after slides of equations and numbers usually don't end well. Me reading first year econometrics after having done first year economics and advanced statistics is a far different experience than attempting to read it while entering the HSC.
 

si2136

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I'd actually disagree with this one. A fresh Year 12 attempting to read slides after slides of equations and numbers usually don't end well. Me reading first year econometrics after having done first year economics and advanced statistics is a far different experience than attempting to read it while entering the HSC.
Well that's subjective imo. Depends on how passionate you are about it. I liked the theory and mathematical side of Economics, so I liked it. It's a bit of an honest taste tester.
 

sida1049

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Well that's subjective imo. Depends on how passionate you are about it. I liked the theory and mathematical side of Economics, so I liked it. It's a bit of an honest taste tester.
I agree with that thought, but my issue is that incomprehensibility is a turn-off for people. No matter how much someone loves mathematical formality, seeing unfamiliar notation and theoretical complexity higher than what they are exposed to will come off as gibberish. For example, someone fresh into their HSC year attempting to understand random variables and inference regarding regression in the context of econometric analysis would be the equivalent of attempting to read Russian cursive (still, Russian cursive is worse). And while I'm also interested in higher level mathematics/statistics/economics, me attempting to read two years ahead would end up with me browsing BoS a few minutes later.
 

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