Internals inquiry (1 Viewer)

Atarndat

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Hi all, This is an inquiry relating moderation Of internal assessment tasks for maths extension 1 (and in general all subjects).

this goes back all the way to term 1 when we sat our task 1. The weighting was 25% and included inverse functions, integration and trig (I.e. Auxiliary angles Etc). along With 2 other people, I got the top mark of 43/47. but the average mark in my class was a little above 60%, and many people were really upset at their marks.

so in term 2 (for the task I just sat, weighting 35%), the teacher wanted to boost the confidence of our class, so what he did was he made this task an OPEN BOOK ASSESSMENT TASK - we were given a question bank and could bring in whatever notes we had. But the questions (vectors, diff equations) were literally copied from the question bank and was extremely easy. Again, I along With the 2 people (all three of us are tight Competitors) got full Marks and topped it.

even though the average mark was 80% (easy test), the teacher for some reason decided to create A THIRD TASK that is a topic test based only on binomials (again, open book and 10%).

so here’s my question. Adding all the percentages up, my trial mark for extension 1 will only constitute 30% of my final mark, which is LESS than task 2 that I just did. So when the marks of my cohort get moderated, will our mark get scaled down?
 

beetree1

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Your mark gets scaled up or down based on your internal mark, compared to your external mark.
For example if your schools gets roughly 70s in internals, and 90s in externals, then they would think that your school's exams were hard and scale up your HSC mark, and vice versa.
 

#RoadTo31Atar

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Your mark gets scaled up or down based on your internal mark, compared to your external mark.
For example if your schools gets roughly 70s in internals, and 90s in externals, then they would think that your school's exams were hard and scale up your HSC mark, and vice versa.
Does this mean that a good student will get a worse mark because of bad cohort or does it somehow even out or something?
 

beetree1

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Does this mean that a good student will get a worse mark because of bad cohort or does it somehow even out or something?
your school determines whether they will push up one student or the whole cohort when giving marks to NESA, so depending on your school and your performace, if you are a good student then your mark shouldnt be affected by your cohort.
 

#RoadTo31Atar

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your school determines whether they will push up one student or the whole cohort when giving marks to NESA, so depending on your school and your performace, if you are a good student then your mark shouldnt be affected by your cohort.
Idk if you're saying that the 1st position student doesn't get "scaled down" or not because a lot of people use that example and as far as I understand how the HSC works that's true - the 1st position student at a bad school doesn't get scaled down. But a good student might be someone who is in the top 5 for all his subjects but not 1st in everything, do you know how that situation would work as far as scaling down or not?
 

beetree1

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Idk if you're saying that the 1st position student doesn't get "scaled down" or not because a lot of people use that example and as far as I understand how the HSC works that's true - the 1st position student at a bad school doesn't get scaled down. But a good student might be someone who is in the top 5 for all his subjects but not 1st in everything, do you know how that situation would work as far as scaling down or not?
Sir i know. its the same either way. honestly if youre that stressed about it, just dont. because obviously scaling is out of your control and is wholly dependant on other things that you cannot manage, you should rather just focus on what you CAN control - your own marks. just keep up that top5 ranks in everything and im sure youll do fine
 

Greninja340

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Idk if you're saying that the 1st position student doesn't get "scaled down" or not because a lot of people use that example and as far as I understand how the HSC works that's true - the 1st position student at a bad school doesn't get scaled down. But a good student might be someone who is in the top 5 for all his subjects but not 1st in everything, do you know how that situation would work as far as scaling down or not?
I heard that if you are first in internals your internals mark is the highest mark scored by someone in your school in the externals and 2nd in internals gets the 2nd highest and so on, so only your rank matters
 

Trebla

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Hi all, This is an inquiry relating moderation Of internal assessment tasks for maths extension 1 (and in general all subjects).

this goes back all the way to term 1 when we sat our task 1. The weighting was 25% and included inverse functions, integration and trig (I.e. Auxiliary angles Etc). along With 2 other people, I got the top mark of 43/47. but the average mark in my class was a little above 60%, and many people were really upset at their marks.

so in term 2 (for the task I just sat, weighting 35%), the teacher wanted to boost the confidence of our class, so what he did was he made this task an OPEN BOOK ASSESSMENT TASK - we were given a question bank and could bring in whatever notes we had. But the questions (vectors, diff equations) were literally copied from the question bank and was extremely easy. Again, I along With the 2 people (all three of us are tight Competitors) got full Marks and topped it.

even though the average mark was 80% (easy test), the teacher for some reason decided to create A THIRD TASK that is a topic test based only on binomials (again, open book and 10%).

so here’s my question. Adding all the percentages up, my trial mark for extension 1 will only constitute 30% of my final mark, which is LESS than task 2 that I just did. So when the marks of my cohort get moderated, will our mark get scaled down?
The distribution of your internal marks (i.e. ranks and relative gaps between ranks) will be largely preserved, but the actual marks you get will be adjusted based on your collective external marks.

If there is a large chunk of you bunched up at the top, that is likely a sign of poorly designed assessment tasks being conducted by the school. Good assessment tasks should be able to create enough spread in the marks to discriminate the different levels of the cohort.
 

quickoats

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This process is not “scaling”, it is moderation. It’s covered quite well elsewhere on the forum but put simply, it works like this:

Your school will administer exams/tasks, and determine a mark for each student - this forms a dataset. The students do the final HSC exam and the series of marks becomes a dataset. NESA uses the cohorts final HSC marks and sort of “superimposes” them onto the internal marks from school.

They take the top mark and bottom mark (unless there are extreme outliers) from the HSC and shove everyone in between, making sure that the relative spaces between students (from the schools data) are the same. It gets a bit more complex when people rank differently in school than in the HSC, but usually people roughly perform the same (relative to their cohort).

Here’s a simple example.

StudentSchool MarkHSC Exam Mark
A9975
B9869
C9772
D9666
The internal moderated marks would be 75, 72, 69 and 66 for ABCD respectively (the real HSC dataset adapted to reflect the internal ranks and relative spaces. NESA probably have something a bit more complex going on.


If the tests were super easy in comparison to the HSC, it is likely that your moderated mark (Internal mark) will be lower than your true school mark. This is dependent on your school’s performance in the final exams.
 

#RoadTo31Atar

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This process is not “scaling”, it is moderation. It’s covered quite well elsewhere on the forum but put simply, it works like this:

Your school will administer exams/tasks, and determine a mark for each student - this forms a dataset. The students do the final HSC exam and the series of marks becomes a dataset. NESA uses the cohorts final HSC marks and sort of “superimposes” them onto the internal marks from school.

They take the top mark and bottom mark (unless there are extreme outliers) from the HSC and shove everyone in between, making sure that the relative spaces between students (from the schools data) are the same. It gets a bit more complex when people rank differently in school than in the HSC, but usually people roughly perform the same (relative to their cohort).

Here’s a simple example.

StudentSchool MarkHSC Exam Mark
A9975
B9869
C9772
D9666
The internal moderated marks would be 75, 72, 69 and 66 for ABCD respectively (the real HSC dataset adapted to reflect the internal ranks and relative spaces. NESA probably have something a bit more complex going on.



If the tests were super easy in comparison to the HSC, it is likely that your moderated mark (Internal mark) will be lower than your true school mark. This is dependent on your school’s performance in the final exams.
This answers my question thx
 

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