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Silly mistakes (1 Viewer)

dumNerd

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Can someone please tell me how to fricken concentrate in a maths tet. I had the easiest test but I made like a million silly mistakes because I was thinking about everything but the actual questions. Can someone please fucken tell me how to concentrate. If it was a harder test it wouldn't have mattered because I get all the questions but because this test was so easy my rank has dropped a lot, I know it is year 10 but my school has a top class system.
 

Vitrecan

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Probably do timed tests at home to train yourself.
 

#RoadTo31Atar

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If it is so easy you should do the test twice, if it is not actually that easy then go a bit slower and be more aware of the stuff you're doing. I usually do the test out of order starting with the stuff that is the easiest for me to do and I build up to the harder/trickier questions. I always go slow(er) rather than doing the test twice because doing the same test twice is really boring to me and I begin skipping questions because they seem too easy to get wrong, I just check stuff as I do it to catch mistakes. It may not be the 4-5 mark questions that you make silly mistakes on anyway, it may be small 1-2 mark questions which you lose the majority if your marks on so don't think that 5 marks = really hard and tricky question, but try to think of it more like what is a hard question for you specifically.
 

idkkdi

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Can someone please tell me how to fricken concentrate in a maths tet. I had the easiest test but I made like a million silly mistakes because I was thinking about everything but the actual questions. Can someone please fucken tell me how to concentrate. If it was a harder test it wouldn't have mattered because I get all the questions but because this test was so easy my rank has dropped a lot, I know it is year 10 but my school has a top class system.
No way around it other than not making the mistakes lol. How to not? Idk, that's something you figure out yourself. Best method is probably to mark and think about everything you regularly do with a tinge of self-induced OCD.
 
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quickoats

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Best method is probably to mark and think about everything you regularly do like a special ed OCD kid.
Hey, please don’t talk about mental disorders in this way. It’s not a joke. OCD manifests itself in many different forms and those experiencing OCD may or may not have such traits, and may or may not require special education to address their individual needs. Comments like this stigmatise those who are getting the help they require through special education and make those in need less willing to get the help and support they require. At best this is just plain ignorant.

To the OP, just be careful and go step by step. It’s very easy to make arithmetic errors (sometimes your times tables or adding up fractions can screw with your brain) so double check everything :). Especially with maths, if you can afford the time, slow down! I know it might be tempting to rush through the exam like a speed demon so you can triple check at the end, but it’s hard to pick out mistakes after you’ve made them, as you made them thinking you were correct.
 

dumNerd

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If it is so easy you should do the test twice, if it is not actually that easy then go a bit slower and be more aware of the stuff you're doing. I usually do the test out of order starting with the stuff that is the easiest for me to do and I build up to the harder/trickier questions. I always go slow(er) rather than doing the test twice because doing the same test twice is really boring to me and I begin skipping questions because they seem too easy to get wrong, I just check stuff as I do it to catch mistakes. It may not be the 4-5 mark questions that you make silly mistakes on anyway, it may be small 1-2 mark questions which you lose the majority if your marks on so don't think that 5 marks = really hard and tricky question, but try to think of it more like what is a hard question for you specifically.
Lmao, I did do the test twice....I just looked over the really easy questions like you said and those easy questions led on to me getting the harder questions wrong
 

dumNerd

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Hey, please don’t talk about mental disorders in this way. It’s not a joke. OCD manifests itself in many different forms and those experiencing OCD may or may not have such traits, and may or may not require special education to address their individual needs. Comments like this stigmatise those who are getting the help they require through special education and make those in need less willing to get the help and support they require. At best this is just plain ignorant.

To the OP, just be careful and go step by step. It’s very easy to make arithmetic errors (sometimes your times tables or adding up fractions can screw with your brain) so double check everything :). Especially with maths, if you can afford the time, slow down! I know it might be tempting to rush through the exam like a speed demon so you can triple check at the end, but it’s hard to pick out mistakes after you’ve made them, as you made them thinking you were correct.
Facts thanks
 

Minari243

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Facts thanks
Usually I just pick up on silly mistakes ive done after doing practice papers and record them all down on my phone. Then before the exam I have a look at the list for a while. It doesnt guarantee that you dont make any silly mistakes but I think it helps
 

quickoats

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Best method is probably to mark and think about everything you regularly do with a tinge of self-induced OCD.
Sadly this didn't pass the vibe check. While it's good that you decided to change your wording, we really shouldn't be using such clinical terms like that. OCD isn't something you can just turn on and off and induce yourself - this would be akin to 'self inducing' something like bipolar. Maybe you could use words like "meticulously" or "carefully" instead.

I know these words are in society's general vernacular but we can all do better to improve. Hopefully this educates you just a little bit :)
 

idkkdi

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Sadly this didn't pass the vibe check. While it's good that you decided to change your wording, we really shouldn't be using such clinical terms like that. OCD isn't something you can just turn on and off and induce yourself - this would be akin to 'self inducing' something like bipolar. Maybe you could use words like "meticulously" or "carefully" instead.

I know these words are in society's general vernacular but we can all do better to improve. Hopefully this educates you just a little bit :)
I contend that OCD is self-inducable.

Like all psychological disorders, it's not a matter of whether you have it or not, it's where you are on a scale. Take bipolar for instance, excessive mood swings happen to everyone, rather we clarify the severity by the extent and commonality.
Anxiety, depression etc. all work the same way. Everyone has it, it just depends on how mild/severe it is. This can also vary depending on circumstance, i.e., near testing periods.

To finalise my arguments, like any trait, obsession is able to be brought out through training yourselves. If I have your parents/teacher/anyoneyouknow spewing depressing things at you all day long, I would bet that you would get pretty depressed. Similarly, with the bipolar example, if you forced yourself to be excessively emotional at, e.g. certain times of day, for years, I would predict similar effects to the severity of that condition for you.
While certainly innately born for some, I would not contend that such things are not able to be induced. Though unable to be turned on and off, turning on via repetition is probably doable.
Thus, OCD for maths, can be self-induced, by obsessively looking at things such that it becomes muscle memory/habitual for you to look at things in such a way, with such consistency and with such continuity.

Hence, I believe you were a bit too sensitive with my change of word choice. I will take the Special ed reference, but not this one.
 
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B1andB2

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i do the test twice, and not just look over my answers, but like actually do it again lightly in pencil LOL and my silly mistakes --> 0
 

quickoats

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Like all psychological disorders, it's not a matter of whether you have it or not, it's where you are on a scale. Take bipolar for instance, excessive mood swings happen to everyone, rather we clarify the severity by the extent and commonality.
I'm not a clinical psychologist, but your changes in mood which happen day to day is not a case of mild bipolar. Bipolar involves prolonged periods of depression alternating with abnormally elevated moods. Don't use the term for something else. The same could be said about autism and ADHD, which are often erroneously thrown around (usually in a cruel context). However, using terms like anxious and depressed are okay as they are emotions - just don't say "omg I have depression" when you get a bit sad because you lost a soccer game or something. Using such vocabulary minimises the experiences of those who struggle with their diagnoses. There's plenty of words in the the English language that are good substitutes.

your statement telling dumNerd to "mark and think about everything you regularly do with a tinge of self-induced OCD" is akin to telling someone to lose weight by 'thinking about everything you regularly eat with a tinge of self-induced anorexia.'

It's just not something you want to tell someone to have. I know what you meant, but these words shouldn't be taken lightly.

And to reply to
like any trait, obsession is able to be brought out through training yourselves.
, I agree with you. However, you shouldn't be actively trying to train yourself to gain a mental illness. This comes down the the nature vs nurture argument, but of course nurture plays a large role when considering mental illnesses. And I apologise for the lack of clarity in my quote which this statement responds to: "OCD isn't something you can just turn on and off and induce yourself". Of course, it can be manifested through habit and environment, but I meant it in a way like you can't activate OCD mode for the purposes of doing a maths test.

Mental illnesses shouldn't be glamourised as a handy tool to have (they are debilitating), nor should they be stigmatised as something you should be ashamed of having. As a society we need to educate ourselves, and look out for others, so that those who are experiencing mental illnesses feel comfortable with sharing their experiences or confiding in someone. I know this seems extreme for just a little choice of wording (which is thrown around haphazardly), but every small thing counts :)
 

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