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The Tempest Quote: technique urgent help will smith confirmed (1 Viewer)

lucywills24

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Hi... yes, I can't seem to find any techniques in this very butchered quote that has been chopped up but it's fine. If anyone could please give me some ideas that would be very much appreciated, I know there are techniques however my brain is severely fried... thanks!

“Abhorred slave… I pitied thee, took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each hour one thing or other. When thou didst not, savage, but wouldst gabble like a thing most brutish… deserved more than prison…” - Miranda to Caliban
 

jimmysmith560

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In addition to the above, anaphora seems like a technique that is used as part of this quote, precisely in "I pitied thee", "took pains to make thee speak" and "taught thee hour one thing or other". The effect of an anaphora lies in its appeal to the audience of a particular text (in this case, The Tempest). By repeating a particular word, readers are invited to anticipate the following sentence/line or the remaining part of a sentence, allowing them to engage with the text, creating a sense of participation.

The quote/passage as a whole constitutes a metaphor, the aim of which is to depict Caliban as an animal (this is underpinned by "savage" and "a thing most brutish"), in order to convey that Caliban is incapable of doing a particular thing and may also constitute an attempt to degrade Caliban (this is something that you could probably expand upon yourself, given your familiarity with the text). Mentioning that a cave is a more suitable place to live than a prison (i.e. "... more than a prison") serves to strengthen the notion of comparing Caliban to an animal since a cave would not normally be perceived as a place where humans live, but rather animals.

I hope this helps! 😄
 

lucywills24

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simile
there are negative connotations throughout, I think the repetitions of "thee" make some alliterations.
In addition to the above, anaphora seems like a technique that is used as part of this quote, precisely in "I pitied thee", "took pains to make thee speak" and "taught thee hour one thing or other". The effect of an anaphora lies in its appeal to the audience of a particular text (in this case, The Tempest). By repeating a particular word, readers are invited to anticipate the following sentence/line or the remaining part of a sentence, allowing them to engage with the text, creating a sense of participation.

The quote/passage as a whole constitutes a metaphor, the aim of which is to depict Caliban as an animal (this is underpinned by "savage" and "a thing most brutish"), in order to convey that Caliban is incapable of doing a particular thing and may also constitute an attempt to degrade Caliban (this is something that you could probably expand upon yourself, given your familiarity with the text). Mentioning that a cave is a more suitable place to live than a prison (i.e. "... more than a prison") serves to strengthen the notion of comparing Caliban to an animal since a cave would not normally be perceived as a place where humans live, but rather animals.

I hope this helps! 😄
Thank you both this is really helpful!!! I appreciate it!
 

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