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Urgent questions - please help 🙏🙏🙏 (1 Viewer)

eternallyboreduser

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MS GU IS GOATED 🗣🗣🗣🗣
Had ms gu today and she’s probably the best out of the teachers i’ve had so far (2 others) and maybe i’m dumb but I feel like some of her explanations r slightly flawed and confusing to understand but that could just be me and my stupidity
 

eternallyboreduser

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Had ms gu today and she’s probably the best out of the teachers i’ve had so far (2 others) and maybe i’m dumb but I feel like some of her explanations r slightly flawed and confusing to understand but that could just be me and my stupidity
I also do it online so f2f is probably a better experience but it’s way too far for me to travel there
 

Luukas.2

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1) In metallic lattices why and how do the electrons become delocalised?

2) How exactly does molecular mass increasing lead to an increased strength of dispersion forces? I understand that this leads to a higher probability of temporary dipoles forming but i’m unsure on how this acts on the strength

Thank you!!!
1. The valence electron(s) in the outermost sub-shell of a metal are located (relatively speaking) far from the nucleus. Packed into a lattice, these orbitals overlap an, in the case of metals, allow for continuous pathways between multiple atoms. Valence electrons can thus become delocalised and no longer bound to any single atom. In effect, the lattice of (say) iron metal consists of iron(II) cations with the two 4s2 electrons from each atom free to move through a network of overlapping 4s orbitals. Most of the electrons remain bound to individual atoms / cations, relatively few are delocalised (in iron's case, no more than 2 to 3 / 26).

2. Increasing molar mass leads to an overall increase in strength of dispersion forces for two main reasons:
  • First, a molecule with more mass has more electrons, and so the probability of a random distribution producing a distribution resulting in a transient dipole is increased.
  • Second, with more electrons, the chances of a larger inequality (and thus a stronger transient dipole) is increased.
Thus, transient dipoles will form more frequently and will be, on average, greater in magnitude.
 

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