Recent content by Eagle Mum

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    Medicine 😎

    The UNSW course is very well organised but for some people, one of the pros of studying at UoN or WSU might be that they are five year courses vs UNSW’s six year course. Financial background might be a factor for some.
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    Help!!

    I strongly suggest this web page for a review of the different types of intramolecular bonds and intermolecular forces. https://sites.duke.edu/thepepproject/module-2-drug-testing-a-hair-brained-idea/teacher-notes-chemical-bonds-and-forces/ The intermolecular force between the sucrose molecules...
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    Help!!

    I’m not sure about the term ‘bind’ with other sugar molecules. The sucrose molecules are attracted to each other and held together by intermolecular forces. This web page provides an illustration and a brief explanation. https://rotsartlinearglucose.weebly.com/intermolecular-forces.html
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    Help!!

    Sucrose (common table sugar which is a disaccharide of glucose and fructose) is a weakly polar molecule (even though it is not ionic), so sucrose molecules are attracted to each other and held together by intermolecular forces.
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    Help!!

    Yes, crystallisation of the sugar does separate it from the water so it is the intention of the exercise. If you don’t need the water, condensation is unnecessary. (Sorry, I’ve only just read the original post - I was replying to your post later in the thread.)
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    Help!!

    You can separate sugar & water by distillation which involves evaporation then condensation of the water. There are YouTube videos with demonstrations. A previous poster was correct to advise that it will turn into caramel if the temperature is too hot. Water boils at 100 deg C and sugar...
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    how are ions atomised in a flame test???

    Well, this has turned out to be an interesting thread in the area of chemistry physics which I haven’t thought about for several decades. Thanks. I think it is noteworthy that many of the well accepted textbooks for secondary school chemistry teach that the colour from the flame tests are from...
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    how are ions atomised in a flame test???

    Crossed posts. Spectroscopy has shown C3H3+, H3O+, CHO+ species downstream of unseeded flames suggesting that the hydrocarbons from the fuel source and their oxidised products are species that have given up electrons.
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    how are ions atomised in a flame test???

    “For a flame test with sodium chloride, the question that @dumNerd asks is, for me, critical... if sodium chloride were somehow producing uncharged sodium atoms in a flame test, where is the electron coming from to reduce the sodium cation?” I understand that spectroscopy has shown C3H3+, H3O+...
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    how are ions atomised in a flame test???

    “that does not mean that excitations can't be 2p to 3s to 3p and reverse, to give the flame colour, with an alternative being a 2p to 3d excitation with a 3d to 3p to 3s to 2p relaxation pathway.” Do you have the specifications on the energy required to excite a 2p electron to the 3d orbit level?
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    how are ions atomised in a flame test???

    “However, sodium metal oxidises rapidly in air and sodium oxide (Na2O) melts at 1132 degC and sublimes around 1275 degC. Even if sodium metal is present, placing it into a flame with an ample supply of air guarantees it will become sodium ions as part of an oxide rapidly.” Yes, I agree, some of...
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    Tricks in permutation and cominations

    I thought they were essentially the same process. When you draw a tree diagram, you multiple the probabilities of consecutive events along each branch, then you add the final products of the branches that fit the stated conditions/outcomes.
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    Medicine 😎

    Tm&t, I take it from your emoji that you got an offer to your liking?
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    how are ions atomised in a flame test???

    The characteristic yellow colour from sodium in a flame test is from the excitation of its outermost electron and subsequent decay from the 3p orbit to 3s orbit. The sodium cation by definition does not possess this outer electron, so whilst in practice, the sample in the flame is quite likely a...
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    How legitimate is this report on the "worst" degrees?

    Intelligence and some overview of the terrain.
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