Computer IT HELP (1 Viewer)

kimnuon

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So in the future i just want to build computer for a living.
So in high school right now i am doing
1unit english (Standard)
2 units Math
No Science subjects
I have heard from a couple of friends that if you want to take IT course in uni you need to do physics, im not really sure about that . Is this true?
 

OzKo

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When you say you want to "build computer", what do you mean by this?
 

OzKo

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You don't need a degree to do that.
 

SnowFox

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Yeah def dont need a degree for that.
Do a cert 2 IT General from TAFE and that should be all, but in saying that the personal IT industry is rather hard to get employment in.
 

chriscasha

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TBH you would be waisting your time and money to do a course for this, go get a TAFE course and you're all good.

Building computers as in buying motherboard's, cpu's, ssd's, hdd's and etc? Trust me when I say this, the market is verrrrrrrrrrrrrrrry niche and is really hard to get into by yourself, try and join a larger company being a computer technician and go from there.

For example sitting in a store (assuming you buy one) and the people coming in for speciality builds will be very minimal, you will most likely get people who want a cheap pc enough for word and etc gaming builds are usually people are semi-intelligent in terms of IT so your chances are limited for that.

I guess what I'm saying is you wont make a lot of profit as you can't compete with places like Dell, HP, Ibuypower, pccasegear and etc their bulk buying power allows them to price their systems competitively.

By all means pursue this but be weary of the fact that it will be really tough until you get a decent customer base, how you get that will be extremely hard.

Good luck and I do think you should do a TAFE course for it although it isn't really necessary.
 

MrBrightside

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TBH you would be waisting your time and money to do a course for this, go get a TAFE course and you're all good.

Building computers as in buying motherboard's, cpu's, ssd's, hdd's and etc? Trust me when I say this, the market is verrrrrrrrrrrrrrrry niche and is really hard to get into by yourself, try and join a larger company being a computer technician and go from there.

For example sitting in a store (assuming you buy one) and the people coming in for speciality builds will be very minimal, you will most likely get people who want a cheap pc enough for word and etc gaming builds are usually people are semi-intelligent in terms of IT so your chances are limited for that.

I guess what I'm saying is you wont make a lot of profit as you can't compete with places like Dell, HP, Ibuypower, pccasegear and etc their bulk buying power allows them to price their systems competitively.

By all means pursue this but be weary of the fact that it will be really tough until you get a decent customer base, how you get that will be extremely hard.

Good luck and I do think you should do a TAFE course for it although it isn't really necessary.
This. If you want to go down this stream, do it as only a side option. Don't devote you entire career upon it. Get a 9am-5pm Mon-Fri job at a computing company, and then have your side repairs over the weekends or at nights for your local community customers.

Most people these days end up buying new computers instead of repairing them. This is due to ignorance in some cases, or simply that in other cases it's cheaper to buy a new machine than to repair one.
 
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Gigacube

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An apprenticeship or traineeship might interest you. It will allow you to study at TAFE and get a qualification and gain real paid (I think you get paid) experience at the same time.

I think that experience will get you further in this industry than a qualification will. It's all well and good to say that you have a Cert II but if you have the experience then you can actually demonstrate that you know how to get the job done and are able to jump straight into the job.
 

Moldy81

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Hi, At UWS, we do not have any compulsory subject requirements. We merely have recommended subjects. This means that even if you do not complete the recommended HSC subjects, you can still definitely apply for the course. The most important key thing is that you enjoy you enjoy your subjects so that you perform well in your HSC and obtain a competitive ATAR. If you are having difficulties in your first year, we provide students with academic support. For more information on this course, please contact the Course Information team on 1300 897 669 or on study@uws.edu.au. Best regards, UWS Course Info.
 

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