• Best of luck to the class of 2019 for their HSC exams. You got this!
    Let us know your thoughts on the HSC exams here

Discover Discovery – a guide from a 99+ student (1 Viewer)

strawberrye

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2012
Messages
3,441
Location
Sydney
Gender
Female
HSC
2013
Uni Grad
2018
Hi Everyone,
For those who don’t know me, just a short intro to myself: My name is Mei, I am a 2013 HSC graduate who got the HSC All Rounders award, having attained band 6s and E4s in all 12 units I did for my HSC, gotten an ATAR of 99.20 and a mark of 93 in English. With the new introduction of a new area of study, I want to deconstruct the discovery rubric and give current HSC students some guidance and new understandings of just the infinite possibilities the rubric provides, hopefully to stimulate their own thinking about how the discovery rubric can be related to your own prescribed and related texts and in creating your own discovery creative. As such, I have selected a significant part of the rubric, where I highlighted the selected parts in bold, and under each section, I wrote some personal analysis extending that particular section on discovery. I welcome any comments and questions on how I can further improve this guide and hopefully you will find it helpful in your HSC English journey.

“Discovery can encompass the experience of discovering something for the first time or rediscovering something that has been lost, forgotten or concealed.”

-It is important to remember that the discovery of something does not need to be tangible items such as a forgotten toy, a lost card, a past birthday present, it can include intangible items such as familial love, happiness, grief, or lost/suppressed memories. The low modality of ‘can’ entails the infinite possibilities presented by a discovery, where it becomes defined by both the process and the outcome, further affirming the continuing impact discoveries can have on individuals. Both discovering something for the first time and rediscovering another thing can bring surprise, discomfort or joy to the individual, and it offers a significant opportunity for them to reassess their previous perspectives and in turn adopt new transformations.

Particularly in the domain of rediscovering a forgotten family heritage/lineage or cultural identity, the impact of the discovery can permanently reshape an individual’s outlook or leave them severely disappointed, such as the experience of many in the Stolen Generations who were unable to retrace their family members or who became devastated when they discover their family members have all died.

The sense of curiosity and intrigue that accompanies the discovery of something for the first time can become the catalyst for continual discoveries. It is also important to keep in mind that discoveries can be made on an individual or collective basis, and this differentiation can have yield significantly different results. Often the rediscovery of something requires new courage, and particularly in the domain of suppressed memories as a result of a traumatic event, the rediscovery of concealed memories can be therapeutic for individuals to rationalise what had occurred and gain a sense of reconciliation through acceptance of such memories.

"Discoveries can be sudden and unexpected, or they can emerge from a process of deliberate and careful planning evoked by curiosity, necessity or wonder."

The notion of an unexpected, sudden discovery can emerge from recollecting back to the movie “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” by Andrew Adamson where the main characters was bored on one rainy day, and discovered a magical wardrobe that opened the doors to a new world. Discoveries can be sudden and unexpected because they may not be voluntary, other individuals in our lives may want to guide us to discoveries without our conscious awareness of it. Sometimes sudden and unexpected discoveries can be as simple as being surprised at a birthday party, which often invokes unexpected joy. Unexpected discoveries also occurs frequently in the process of experimentation, whether it be creative, technological or scientific, where one may find unexpected marine species on a scuba diving trip or a new cure for a disease.

Both the nature of discoveries and the impact of these discoveries can be unexpected. For example, individuals may start investigating into a particular religion by a chance encounter or through the encouragement of others which may give them a renewed sense of spirituality. It might also be worthwhile to consider the various sudden and unexpected discoveries that individuals make about their personality and their capacities when they are left on an island and are forced to survive a hunter-gatherer lifestyle or just going on a camping experience.

Some of the most unexpected discoveries lies in natural disasters which although can be minimised with advanced scientific instruments predicting the probability of its occurrence, can never be quite obliterated. The outcome of any discoveries is not necessarily the outcome that was being planned, and the same discovery can have different emotional and intellectual impacts on different individuals.

The process of deliberate and careful planning often can restrict the nature of discoveries, often suitable for people who always desire to have a sense of control over their destiny. Careful planning often is associated with that of a travel itinerary, where one may plan the places where discoveries may be made, but often the exact nature of the discovery can never be fully appreciated unless the individual is undergoing that particular experience. Curiosity, necessity and wonder represents different motivators for individuals to embark on discoveries. Curiosity can be of geographical landscapes, personalities, or just of gaining more knowledge and often is an innate desire of humanity. Necessity may represent things of personal significance, for example, one may wish to take a break from academic pressures and go on a travelling trip around the world to discover and explore about their desires and broaden their understanding of the world before they consider how they wish to live the next stage of their lives.

Discoveries motivated by wonder may entail a sense of aspiration or inspiration, perhaps of an idol, this may catalysed, for example, a visit into places such idols have lived or researching and extending the work of their idols. It is important to keep in mind that humanity are complex creatures, and real life discoveries may often be motivated by more than one factor, for example, a carefully planned discovery may be the result of necessity and wonder at the same time. One might argue an example of such a discovery was the Space Race in the Cold War period, where there was both the wonder of the new frontier of space exploration as well as the necessity for countries such as America and Russia to display their scientific advancement as an accompaniment to the Cold War rhetoric and geopolitical landscape of the time. Sometimes sudden discoveries can be lifesaving.

With all these discoveries, it is important to keep in mind the possibility of disappointment, the process of careful planning may increase the opportunity of a successful discovery, but it does not guarantee one in anyone. A prime example is to consider rare astronomical events such as lunar eclipses where even if you planned the right spot at the right time, there might be unexpected clouds that inhibits you from viewing the sight. Hence often, whether a discovery is successful or not is both a product of careful planning as well as a bit of fortuitous luck.

Discoveries can be fresh and intensely meaningful in ways that may be emotional, creative, intellectual, physical and spiritual. They can also be confronting and provocative.

Discoveries are fresh in that they can be unexpected or sudden. This part of the rubric places a heavy focus on inner journeys and discovery. Emotional discoveries often arises from reconnecting with important people or at the achievement of an arduous journey or goal, for example, the conclusion of a marathon, or the renewal of a friendship. Creative discoveries arises from experimentation and is often distinguished by an individual’s proactive desires to challenge existing boundaries and create new things. Intellectual discoveries are often the process of careful planning, consider the scientific discoveries that have won Nobel Prizes in the past century, often these research are built on the existing work of other scientists, hence discoveries can be an accumulative and continuous process, which does not necessarily be completed by one person, but by multiple people. Physical discoveries often arises from the exploration of physical landscapes, whether they may be familiar or unfamiliar or even imagined ones. Spiritual discoveries often have a strong long lasting emotional impact on the discoverer, these can include a journey to achieve a sort of religious fulfilment, such as going on a pilgrimage or the decision to become a missionary. Discoveries can be confronting because they often results in the reassessment of previous prejudices, assumptions and social stereotypes and provocative as it may inspire the discoverer to undertake new discoveries and even become a different person, i.e. changing their current occupation as a result having a new idea of what they want to do with the rest of their lives.

"They can lead us to new worlds and values, stimulate new ideas, and enable us to speculate about future possibilities."

New worlds and new values may have both positive and negative impacts on the individual, for example, some discoveries can lead us to adopt cynical or sceptical values about the world, for example, the discovery that we were betrayed or lied to by an individual that we previously have trusted heavily. The stimulation of new ideas can be the catalyst for creative discoveries. The importance of discoveries in igniting our imagination is very important, because often discoveries are limited by the restraints of our own imagination, rather than any physical restraints. The potential for discoveries to enable us to speculate upon future possibilities allows us to adopt a new positive outlook on the future and hence provides a mechanism for us to deal with disappointing or traumatic discoveries. For example, the discovery that a particular animal species have gone extinct may be disappointing, but the speculation of possibilities such as cloning any remaining DNA we may have of that species may leave us with new motivations to preserve not only that particular extinct species, but become more active in our wildness preservation efforts of other species. It is important to emphasise the use of the collective pronoun ‘us’ in this rubric, because this emphasises that discoveries can be made on a collective scale, such as part of a group of friends, family or simply like minded individuals and the stimulation of new ideas, as a result, can arise from discussions or challenging of our perspectives by other individuals. The word ‘enable’ also deserves special mention, as it entails that discoveries can be empowering individuals, particularly from the new knowledge they gained to make own choices and achieve greater autonomy in their lives.

"Discoveries and discovering can offer new understandings and renewed perceptions of ourselves and others."

Sometimes scientific discoveries can deconstruct previous myths. Discovering, for example, that there are raw minerals in space that are not available on Earth and their enormous potential for economic gain as led to renewed perceptions on whether space exploration are really economically feasible or beneficial for society. Sometimes discoveries made outside comfort zones leads to renewed perceptions, consider what new insights and perspectives we have gained when we may have been forced to play truth or dare with our friends and backed out because we realised the particular dare was not something that aligned with our personal values.

The emergent use of social media in recent decade has both proliferate new discoveries around the world, yet has also inhibited a genuine understanding because of the ease to share so much differing opinions where it is often hard to achieve a succinct, truthful understanding accumulated amongst so many different biases. Discoveries and discovering represents a continual, lifelong process, much like the notion that learning is a life long process, which can be reshaped to be understood as the discovery and continual discovering of new knowledge. This part of the rubric also emphasises the impact of time, the evolution of time allows us to accumulate new experiences and new interactions which can forces us to reassess previous perspectives.

Renewed perceptions may not necessarily be beneficial, because perhaps the discovery that someone betrayed us can alienate us from such relationships and individuals. It is also important to note that we often discover ourselves through interactions with others, through the process of communication, other people can accumulate an external understanding of ourselves that we cannot achieve through introspection, for example, often we know more about our personality through being told by our friends what they think of us. These renewed perceptions can be the catalyst for self improvement or they may have little impact if we don’t gain a sincere appreciation of the potential significance and benefits of acceptance of these renewed perceptions. In a way, one may say that discovering encompasses continual discoveries, it is very hard in real life to draw a definitive line marking the start of one discovery and the conclusion of another, rather, they are much like the electromagnetic spectrum, where different types of waves are differentiated by arbitrary divisions of wavelength ranges and frequencies, but their essential character remains the same despite the different classifications of say X-rays and infra red. (both are still self-propagating waves composed of electric and magnetic fields).

"An individual’s discoveries and their process of discovering can vary according to personal, cultural, historical and social contexts and values. The impact of these discoveries can be far-reaching and transformative for the individual and for broader society."

An individual’s values can impact on their reaction to discoveries and where or how they may choose to make new discoveries or prevent themselves from making certain discoveries. For example, if one was raised up in an extremely conservative culture which advocates that women should stay at home to care for kids and take care of the husband, it is unlikely that these women would make discoveries of working in external domain or challenge social norms or expectations for fear of severe repercussions. Hence, one’s values may serves as the parameters for which they make their discoveries in, or they may serve as the fundamental foundations for one to challenge and make new discoveries. It is important to maintain a strong awareness that cultural, historical values may not be monochromatic, but is often complicated by multiple influence, as may arise when one individual migrate from one country to another, or where an individual are raised up in a household of mixed cultures. Social, cultural and arguably, even familial contexts (personal) have a significant impact on how individuals react to discoveries, because they serve as significant influences on developing an individual’s perspectives and values. There is often a strong tendency for individuals to conform rather than pursue individuality for fear of a lack of support towards their goals or simply the desire for social affirmation.

The transformative impact of discoveries is most prominent in the scientific domain, consider the work of Einstein, particularly the equation E=mc^2 which encapsulates the new idea of energy can be converted to mass when accelerated to a high enough speed and vice versa, this discovery both reinforced Einstein’s pacifist views of the need to use science for morally sound purposes, rather than for the purposes of annihilation, but arguably this can be complicated by political pressures, such as Einstein writing a letter to President Roosevelt for him to develop a nuclear bomb in fear that Germany was going to develop one first and destroy the world. The discovery of such a relationship had far reaching impact not just on the progression of world war II, as evidenced by Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings and the subsequent surrender of japan, but also on nuclear developments in nuclear energy plants. Also consider Malala Yousafzai who was the Nobel Peace Prize Laureate of 2014, the discoveries she made on the limitations imposed on women in terms of pursuing educational opportunities made her an activist for empowering women through education, and her story has made significant international resonance and inspired many to join the dissent of voices that inhibits women from pursuing such opportunities which have the potential to significantly and permanently change their lives. The notion that with enough belief, one can change the world resonates strongly in this segment of the rubric.

"Discoveries may be questioned or challenged when viewed from different perspectives and their worth may be reassessed over time. The ramifications of particular discoveries may differ for individuals and their worlds."


The validity of discoveries may be challenged, as often occurs in the scientific domain, where in psychology experimentations, often results may be vulnerable to being manipulated for the pressures of getting published, otherwise it is hard to maintain a reputable career. Discoveries are challenged when viewed from different perspectives because of the different experiences one may have. For example, the discovery of shells on the beach may leave a child elated, but from an adult who may have had a near drowning experience near the beach, it may be a traumatic rediscovery of an unfavourable memory. The ability to reassess the value of discoveries through the progression of time is very important, because it gives us potential for change, potential for the same discovery to have a differing impact on us. For example, at the time, the discovery of an antique coin may not be worth much, but perhaps if we know if the coin has some special significance to a country’s history or is worth a lot financially, we may reassess the worth of such past discoveries, perhaps made by our grandparents long before we were born.

The ramifications of particular discoveries differing for individuals have been emphasised through this deconstruction. It is important to emphasise on the use of the low modality word ‘may’ as it also entails the possibility that discoveries and the impact of discoveries are not necessarily different, they can be very similar, for example, miscarriages are often traumatising for mothers in different stages of their pregnancy. It is also to be aware that often discoveries don’t just have an impact on individuals, but it may have an impact on our dependants, namely our close family and friends, for they may come to share similar grief, or transform their perspectives through our experiences, this conforms to the notion of vicarious learning/modelling in psychology, where we often may not need to physically experience something but we can observe and learn consequences just through looking at what others go through.

I have merely scratched the surface of the discovery rubric, the main discoveries will lie in how closely you come to engage with your prescribed and related texts and how you in time will accumulate your own personal understanding of what discovery entails, how the different parts of the discovery rubric interlinks together in unexpected ways and how best you can utilise these infinite possibilities both in your preparation of exams and writing of creative but also more importantly, in enhancing your own overall enjoyment of this area of study. Hopefully you will come to enjoy and appreciate the vast array of possibilities and freedom provided by the discovery rubric and make new discoveries☺. If you have any questions related to this area of study, please feel free to ask on this thread and I will try my best to reply.
 
Last edited:

butterfly12345

New Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2014
Messages
22
Gender
Undisclosed
HSC
2010
Re: Discover Discovery-a guide from a 99+ student

What are possible essay questions for Discovery - area of study in English Adv paper. My exam is tomorrow
thanks
 

RivalryofTroll

Sleep Deprived Entity
Moderator
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
3,812
Gender
Female
HSC
N/A
Re: Discover Discovery-a guide from a 99+ student

What are possible essay questions for Discovery - area of study in English Adv paper. My exam is tomorrow
thanks
Well, a good place to begin with, in terms of looking for potential questions, is the rubric - in short, refer to the bolded and italicised statements in strawberrye's post.

One of them could very well be the basis of the question that you will be asked tomorrow.
 

Erique

Writ in water
Joined
Feb 10, 2013
Messages
253
Gender
Male
HSC
2014
Re: Discover Discovery-a guide from a 99+ student

It'll be interesting to see how the HSC questions will accommodate for the rubric's seemingly infinite possibilities.
 

strawberrye

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2012
Messages
3,441
Location
Sydney
Gender
Female
HSC
2013
Uni Grad
2018
Re: Discover Discovery-a guide from a 99+ student

It'll be interesting to see how the HSC questions will accommodate for the rubric's seemingly infinite possibilities.
Its not exactly infinite in relation to essay writing because the essay question will need to be broad enough to accommodate all the texts in the module, but the rubric is definitely infinite in relation to creative writing possibilities.
 

turntaker

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 29, 2013
Messages
3,943
Gender
Undisclosed
HSC
2015
Re: Discover Discovery-a guide from a 99+ student

Thanks this will help me for my essay
 

strawberrye

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2012
Messages
3,441
Location
Sydney
Gender
Female
HSC
2013
Uni Grad
2018
Re: Discover Discovery-a guide from a 99+ student

Putting up some random discovery essay questions for people to practice if they want: (All are crafted by me:))

1) Discuss how does your prescribed and at least 1 related text explore the following statement:

"We discover ourselves through others. Rediscoveries can allow us to speculate upon future possibilities."

2)Evaluate to what extent is the following statement true in your prescribed and related text:

"Fresh and intensely meaningful discoveries are often emotional and spiritual and evoked by curiosity or necessity".

3)Explore how your prescribed and related text examines the potential for discoveries to be challenged, and how these challenges can result in far-reaching and transformative impacts for the individual and the broader society.

4)Assess to what extent is the following statement true in your prescribed and related text:

"The experience of discovering something for the first time can be confronting and provocative. It is these unexpected discoveries that ultimately transforms our perceptions the most."

5)Explore how your prescribed and related text examines the notion that an individual's discoveries can vary according to their personal, cultural, historical and social contexts and how these contextual influences can come to have transformative impacts on the individual's sense of identity.
 

strawberrye

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2012
Messages
3,441
Location
Sydney
Gender
Female
HSC
2013
Uni Grad
2018
How do people figure out what the questions mean? Like it takes me like 3-5 hours to figure out what the question means, and then another 2-4 hours deciding what my structure is going to be and what I am going to write about (how i can answer the question with my texts), and also what goes in my paragraphs.
And then it takes me another 2-4 hours to write it.

That means i take 7-13 hours to answer one stupid question, and the exam will be WELL AND TRULY over by then.
Hi there,
I understand your frustration that it sometimes does take a long time to ascertain what the question really means, I think perhaps trying to brainstorm what the key words mean and relate it to the ideas and themes of the rubric and text you are studying is always a good starting point. I think as with every other subject, persistence is very important in english, it might take a very long time at the start, but if you persist enough times, it will get easier. I think asking your teacher for assistance or your tutor (if you have one) would also be a good idea to guide you on the right path and helping you to save time. Another tip I will give you is to stop over-thinking the question-it is extremely important to remember there are more than one plausible answer to the question-and teachers are expecting a diversity of answers in the first place-so perhaps set some sort of time limit for yourself and try to write a draft essay then-you will find that working under some sort of time limit allows you to procrastinate less, stress less, and just write without fearing what you are writing is not perfect-because it doesn't have to be-as long as it's your best shot and answers the question to your best ability:)-Don't give up on English-it is compulsory counting towards your ATAR:)-You still have time to improve:)
 

crabdoctor

New Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2015
Messages
15
Gender
Male
HSC
2015
Thanks a lot for this, should help with my trials in a week and a half.
 

strawberrye

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2012
Messages
3,441
Location
Sydney
Gender
Female
HSC
2013
Uni Grad
2018
Thanks a lot for this, should help with my trials in a week and a half.
You are welcome-if you have any questions related to discovery, feel free to ask:)-Best wishes for your trials-just try your best and leave luck to do the rest!:)
 

pandalove4223

New Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2014
Messages
1
Gender
Female
HSC
2015
thanks a lot for these notes! this will help me so much in my study! and do you have any tips for writing a creative story? i did really bad in it in my trials, but my essays i had not too bad marks!!
 

strawberrye

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2012
Messages
3,441
Location
Sydney
Gender
Female
HSC
2013
Uni Grad
2018
thanks a lot for these notes! this will help me so much in my study! and do you have any tips for writing a creative story? i did really bad in it in my trials, but my essays i had not too bad marks!!
I am glad you found them to be helpful. It's very complicated to condense tips for writing a creative story, but essentially (trying to avoid the cliche ones)

1)Try to explore simple everyday experiences in poignant ways (cultural, friendship, familial, travelling, growing up stories works best)-don't try too hard at plot twisting-you need to focus on conveying relatable discovery concepts instead.
2) In general, writing in first person is more immersive than any other person
3)Got to integrate given stimuli at least three times in a meaningful way-at the beginning, somewhere in the middle and at the conclusion of your story-metaphorical AS WELL as literal!
4) Focus on good character development (a few is better than a lot-by few I mean two or three maximum), setting, plot, try and error-get plenty of external feedback-revise and polish-and hopefully you will get a creative you are happy with!

Good luck for your HSC!
 

EarthSci34

Good grief.
Joined
Oct 19, 2014
Messages
288
Location
New South Wales
Gender
Male
HSC
2015
I am glad you found them to be helpful. It's very complicated to condense tips for writing a creative story, but essentially (trying to avoid the cliche ones)

1)Try to explore simple everyday experiences in poignant ways (cultural, friendship, familial, travelling, growing up stories works best)-don't try too hard at plot twisting-you need to focus on conveying relatable discovery concepts instead.
2) In general, writing in first person is more immersive than any other person
3)Got to integrate given stimuli at least three times in a meaningful way-at the beginning, somewhere in the middle and at the conclusion of your story-metaphorical AS WELL as literal!
4) Focus on good character development (a few is better than a lot-by few I mean two or three maximum), setting, plot, try and error-get plenty of external feedback-revise and polish-and hopefully you will get a creative you are happy with!

Good luck for your HSC!
Strawberrye's advice on creative and essay writing! Both helped me get awesome marks for paper 1! :)
BUMP! :D :D
 
Last edited:

GeorgeKonn

New Member
Joined
May 7, 2015
Messages
1
Gender
Male
HSC
2015
What would be a good strategy to approaching a stimulus that requires a certain sentence to be the start of your creative writing response? For example "It all started to make sense to me now".
 

strawberrye

Premium Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2012
Messages
3,441
Location
Sydney
Gender
Female
HSC
2013
Uni Grad
2018
What would be a good strategy to approaching a stimulus that requires a certain sentence to be the start of your creative writing response? For example "It all started to make sense to me now".
Sorry for the belated response. I think you should include the sentence at least three times in your story-somewhere at the start, somewhere in the middle, and somewhere at the end, and try to see different ways you can incorporate it metaphorically, such as "it all started to make sense to me now-you can contrast your ignorant, confused self with your now starting to piece together everything self:))-essentially like all other things in life practice makes perfect:)
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top