double major or major/minor? (1 Viewer)

totally_screwed

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hello, I graduated in 2020 and will be studying at Usyd this year.
Course: Bachelor of Science/Doctor of Dental Medicine

I was wondering if doing a double major would be better or more beneficial than doing a major and minor (this is for the Bachelor of Science - first 3 years). I know the general differences between the two: a major is worth more credit points and is therefore more work than a minor. also a minor does not appear on the student testamur after completion of the degree, this isn't a bad thing right? would doing a minor make you a less desirable graduate compared to someone who has done two majors, both of which would show up on their testamur?

obviously I'm not looking to work after completing the Bachelor, like I won't even be learning about teeth for the next 3 years except for a dentistry elective worth 0 credit points. since my career-related studies won't happen much until my 4th year, I was thinking that there's no point in doing a double major and working so hard, which leads me to another question, are minors that much harder to complete than majors? like in terms of workload n stuff (majors being 48 cp and minors being 36 cp). I don't mind working a little harder and learning more shit, I just don't know if it's worth it since the Bachelor isn't the part of my course that'll get me a job

currently, I've enrolled with a biology major and a health minor. originally, I went with the same biology major paired with another major but in marketing purely due to interest because commerce is cool. apparently you should pick what is related to your career but also what you find interesting, because you're more likely to perform in subjects you like. so yeah uh did I make a mistake here, going with a major/minor as opposed to a double major? does it even matter lol

any insight is appreciated!
 

edds7575

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Become a tooth fairy.
Hi there! I'm in a similar position to you, I'll be doing the Bachelor of Science/Doctor of Medicine. You shouldn't worry about being a more "desirable" graduate for having two majors since you ultimately want to become a dentist, and nobody will really care about what you did doing undergraduate studies when you are working. It's also worth noting that a major doesn't actually have a heavier workload than a minor. You do more subjects in total (at the expense of stuff such as electives), but you don't do more subjects at once so the workload at any point in time isn't actually heavier.

As for what majors you should pick, it depends on what you want to get out of the undergraduate degree. Some people prefer to pick majors that are related to medicine/dentistry to get them a bit of a head start. Others (like me) pick majors that are as unrelated as possible to explore other interests outside of medicine/dentistry and to have fun. So it depends on what you want to get out of the first degree. Hope this helps!
 

Directrix

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Hi there! I'm in a similar position to you, I'll be doing the Bachelor of Science/Doctor of Medicine. You shouldn't worry about being a more "desirable" graduate for having two majors since you ultimately want to become a dentist, and nobody will really care about what you did doing undergraduate studies when you are working. It's also worth noting that a major doesn't actually have a heavier workload than a minor. You do more subjects in total (at the expense of stuff such as electives), but you don't do more subjects at once so the workload at any point in time isn't actually heavier.

As for what majors you should pick, it depends on what you want to get out of the undergraduate degree. Some people prefer to pick majors that are related to medicine/dentistry to get them a bit of a head start. Others (like me) pick majors that are as unrelated as possible to explore other interests outside of medicine/dentistry and to have fun. So it depends on what you want to get out of the first degree. Hope this helps!
No one cares what course TS does as an undergraduate, what matters is if TS can become a tooth fairy.

Would happily pay TS big money if TS can fix the Bad Breath from the people that sit next to me in class.
 

totally_screwed

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Hi there! I'm in a similar position to you, I'll be doing the Bachelor of Science/Doctor of Medicine. You shouldn't worry about being a more "desirable" graduate for having two majors since you ultimately want to become a dentist, and nobody will really care about what you did doing undergraduate studies when you are working. It's also worth noting that a major doesn't actually have a heavier workload than a minor. You do more subjects in total (at the expense of stuff such as electives), but you don't do more subjects at once so the workload at any point in time isn't actually heavier.

As for what majors you should pick, it depends on what you want to get out of the undergraduate degree. Some people prefer to pick majors that are related to medicine/dentistry to get them a bit of a head start. Others (like me) pick majors that are as unrelated as possible to explore other interests outside of medicine/dentistry and to have fun. So it depends on what you want to get out of the first degree. Hope this helps!
tysm, that's what I was thinking (undergrad doesn't matter so much in my case since the end goal is tooth fairy) but I appreciate the reassurance
I ended up switching to two majors because might as well, good to know that there's not much difference except less electives. thanks again, and congrats!!
 

idkkdi

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Hi there! I'm in a similar position to you, I'll be doing the Bachelor of Science/Doctor of Medicine. You shouldn't worry about being a more "desirable" graduate for having two majors since you ultimately want to become a dentist, and nobody will really care about what you did doing undergraduate studies when you are working. It's also worth noting that a major doesn't actually have a heavier workload than a minor. You do more subjects in total (at the expense of stuff such as electives), but you don't do more subjects at once so the workload at any point in time isn't actually heavier.

As for what majors you should pick, it depends on what you want to get out of the undergraduate degree. Some people prefer to pick majors that are related to medicine/dentistry to get them a bit of a head start. Others (like me) pick majors that are as unrelated as possible to explore other interests outside of medicine/dentistry and to have fun. So it depends on what you want to get out of the first degree. Hope this helps!
99.6usyd???????????rural?eas?
 

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