Finding a job overseas (United States) (1 Viewer)

johnnys20

New Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2020
Messages
7
Gender
Male
HSC
2021
Hi all.

I am planning to study mechatronic or aeronautical engineering at usyd (if i can make it). What's the process of finding a job in the US like? Also information about green cards or E3 visas would be appreciated as well, thank you
 

jimmysmith560

Le Phénix Trilingue
Moderator
Joined
Aug 22, 2019
Messages
4,207
Location
Krak des Chevaliers
Gender
Male
HSC
2019
Uni Grad
2022
A Green Card holder is someone who has been granted permission to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis. As proof of that status, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) grants a person a permanent resident card, commonly called a "Green Card." This is the US equivalent of a permanent resident in Australia.

You may be eligible to apply for a Green Card as an immigrant worker, provided you satisfy one of the following:
  • you are a first preference immigrant worker
  • you are a second preference immigrant worker
  • you are a third preference immigrant worker
Specific criteria within each category can be found using the link below:


The E-3 classification applies only to nationals of Australia. You must be coming to the United States solely to perform services in a specialty occupation. The specialty occupation requires theoretical and practical application of a body of highly specialized knowledge and the attainment of a bachelor's or higher degree in the specific specialty, or its equivalent, as a minimum for entry into the occupation in the United States. As a Bachelor of Engineering graduate, it is likely that you will meet this basic requirement. The eligibility criteria for this classification is as follows:
  • Be a national of Australia
  • Have a legitimate offer of employment in the United States
  • Possess the necessary academic or other qualifying credentials
  • Will fill a position that qualifies as a specialty occupation
You can access more information about this classification using the link below:


Because of this, it would definitely be a good idea to contact one (or more) employer you are interested in working for in the US upon (or prior to) graduation and (if applicable) determine any additional requirements from particular US employers.

I hope this helps! :D
 

blyatman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2018
Messages
539
Gender
Undisclosed
HSC
N/A
If you just have a bachelors, it will be very difficult. Companies need to fork out cash to sponsor a visa, and most of the time, they need to prove that the local talent is not available, and hence require them to source talent internationally. As a result, there is often no need for them to hire a graduate without the right to work in the US, since there are so many graduates locally. Therefore, to get sponsored as a graduate, you often need to be extremely (and I mean extremely) talented.

The best way in is to get into the country on a study visa, which allows you to have some number of working hours. It's much easier to get a job on a study visa, as you technically have some right to work.

In Aus and the UK, there's also a particular type of holiday visa for graduates under a certain age to travel there and work for 2 years. I'm not sure if something exists for the US, but that could be one option. Another way to get your foot in the door might be to take an unpaid internship, which could lead to sponsorship if the company wants to keep u.

It also depends on the type of job. If you're looking at aerospace, chances are it'll require defence clearance, which in turn will only accept US green card holders or citizens.
 

seremify007

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2004
Messages
10,062
Location
Sydney, Australia
Gender
Male
HSC
2005
Uni Grad
2009
am planning to study mechatronic or aeronautical engineering at usyd (if i can make it). What's the process of finding a job in the US like? Also information about green cards or E3 visas would be appreciated as well, thank you
Best bet is to get a job locally at an MNC or a US-HQ'd company, and then get an internal transfer or secondment.

The process to get working rights in the US is not cheap or easy. I personally went nearly a decade ago on an L1 visa and even with a law firm helping with the forms, it was a troublesome process.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top