is clonal selection part of the bio syllabus?? (1 Viewer)

lildumpling86

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hi everyone!
i was doing an atar notes topic test and for one of the module 7 topic tests (specifically the immunity section), i come across a question asking about the process of clonal selection.
i've never covered this in class so i was wondering if it's part of the syllabus?
 

Leadmen4y

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i encountered this too, it's not specified so its unlikely but possible, maybe in a stimulus question. it's quite an important concept in adaptive community so probs good to know
 

Hivaclibtibcharkwa

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It isn’t but it’s certainly the most fascinating topic in biology. The possiblity that we simply possess a memory cell for each antigen to ever exist without even encountering it is insane. This hints towards divine creation
 

HasanJamali

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Hi, my school did end up covering, albeit very briefly. It's just a particular theory for how our immune system works adaptively and I guess it's good to know but it is not directly in the syllabus. Although, it is in both of the HSC textbooks I used (Pearson and Biology in Focus). If you want, here's a quick rundown:

Clonal selection refers to the theory that each B lymphocyte has its own unique B cell receptor which when binded to specific antigens result in the production of specific effector cells that have been ‘selected’ for an immune response against the antigen. The process occurs as such:
  1. A hematopoietic stem cell differentiates to produce immature lymphocytes.
  2. These B cells have many different antigen receptors (paratopes in BCRs) that are made to interact with a bunch of antigens.
  3. Those which are activated by random antigens are stimulated to undergo cloning, enabling formation of plasma cells and memory B cells specific to the counteraction of the invading pathogen.
 

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