Is it too much to ask for a job/career in arts, social science etc etc that pays good, has very good job growth and highly satisfying? (1 Viewer)

[ ]

Active Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2019
Messages
157
Gender
Male
HSC
2020
I want money, but I also want other things like job satisfaction or any thing that can lever up my life (such as develop my perspectives)
 

YonOra

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2020
Messages
373
Gender
Undisclosed
HSC
2021
I want money, but I also want other things like job satisfaction or any thing that can lever up my life (such as develop my perspectives)
I mean naturally, all fields will have successful individuals. I think the fields you've listed have quite a high job satisfaction - because most who go into those fields, don't give a shit about the money. However, today these fields of study are quite over-saturated, so the jobs don't pay very well overall (as far as i've seen). Keep in mind i'm no recruiter, nor a uni student. Just observations lol.
 

#RoadTo31Atar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Messages
328
Gender
Undisclosed
HSC
2020
The problem with a job having low wages is usually a bigger problem of over-supply of people willing to do the job for less money than the guy before him and so on. Idk why this can happen but I guess it could be when unis produce too many graduates of a certain field/degree and if it's social science it is very hard to show to someone (an interviewer for e.g) that you are better than another candidate so they start choosing based on work experience and who they can pay less. On top of the difficulty of finding a job that has a low wage you will also need to pay back hecs debt and overall I doubt you will ever have an abundance of money if you choose social science or something.

As an example of the opposite I'll use software development:

1. High wages with recruiters headhunting employees from other companies
2. Difficult to graduate because it is very hard (compared to scraping by in a 70 atar arts course) meaning there is not too many people qualified to do this
3. A soft developer can easily find a job at another company so he doesn't need to accept a low wage from someone
4. Coding interviews and portfolios can show why you're better than other candidates

Not saying you should forget about art and social science but from what you wrote it seems like having a high paying job would tick all the boxes because if you had a very income would you not have job satisfaction and perspectives - you could possibly even retire early and be able to buy whatever you want/need. To me the scenario of barely paying the bills with a job I'm passionate about sounds miserable af.
 

turtle67

Active Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2020
Messages
85
Gender
Male
HSC
2021
The problem with a job having low wages is usually a bigger problem of over-supply of people willing to do the job for less money than the guy before him and so on. Idk why this can happen but I guess it could be when unis produce too many graduates of a certain field/degree and if it's social science it is very hard to show to someone (an interviewer for e.g) that you are better than another candidate so they start choosing based on work experience and who they can pay less. On top of the difficulty of finding a job that has a low wage you will also need to pay back hecs debt and overall I doubt you will ever have an abundance of money if you choose social science or something.

As an example of the opposite I'll use software development:

1. High wages with recruiters headhunting employees from other companies
2. Difficult to graduate because it is very hard (compared to scraping by in a 70 atar arts course) meaning there is not too many people qualified to do this
3. A soft developer can easily find a job at another company so he doesn't need to accept a low wage from someone
4. Coding interviews and portfolios can show why you're better than other candidates

Not saying you should forget about art and social science but from what you wrote it seems like having a high paying job would tick all the boxes because if you had a very income would you not have job satisfaction and perspectives - you could possibly even retire early and be able to buy whatever you want/need. To me the scenario of barely paying the bills with a job I'm passionate about sounds miserable af.
would this apply for something like an economics degree, which is considered by many to be a social science?
 

#RoadTo31Atar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Messages
328
Gender
Undisclosed
HSC
2020
would this apply for something like an economics degree, which is considered by many to be a social science?
I'm very interested in eco and feel like I would enjoy it in uni but that's mostly why I chose to do comp sci instead. Problem I see with economics degrees is that who is actually hiring economists? Especially straight out of uni no experience economists I feel don't have many options.

An example of what I'm talking about is I know an IT company which has around 1000 people and they have 1 economist. How hard would it be to be that one economist who got that job? I think very hard - how many software developers do they have - hundreds and they are hiring devs who have not even finished uni to work full time. I might not know that much about ppl who have economics degrees and where they work but I think that when you consider how little demand there is for economists I personally wouldn't do it as my only option.

Maybe it could be something for a double degree like comp sci/economics or business/economics but I myself would not do business because I think it has a similar problem of not being able to show that you're better than other ppl and over saturation. Also with business you don't really learn how to make anything yourself whereas a soft dev could just write his own program, make a successful company and do whatever he needs without a business degree.
 

#RoadTo31Atar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Messages
328
Gender
Undisclosed
HSC
2020
Hmm yeah I see where you're coming from and I've always sort of thought that, which kind of sucks because that's what I'm genuinely interested in. I was thinking commerce or commerce/economics and major in finance because that's what I like, but it's so popular these days but I'm genuinely interested in finance and economics :/ not so much computer science or engineering or anything like that
There's a pretty good book called 'So good they can't ignore you' which talks about this stuff like skills vs passion for choosing a job. I would recommend reading/listening it before you make up your mind on uni degrees. :)
 

idkkdi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2019
Messages
1,676
Gender
Male
HSC
2021
Hmm yeah I see where you're coming from and I've always sort of thought that, which kind of sucks because that's what I'm genuinely interested in. I was thinking commerce or commerce/economics and major in finance because that's what I like, but it's so popular these days but I'm genuinely interested in finance and economics :/ not so much computer science or engineering or anything like that
I want money, but I also want other things like job satisfaction or any thing that can lever up my life (such as develop my perspectives)
you boys need to understand something. career progression/money is inversely proportional to satisfaction/work-life balance. And that's assuming if you have the ability to actually enter a job where you can take that tradeoff in the first place.

"it's so popular these days but I'm genuinely interested in finance and economics" - this doesn't matter. Just average a 80+ WAM and you good. Not that hard when you consider that it is commerce, and not a STEM course. Now if you're averaging a 80+ WAM in physics, I respect you 10x more than a commerce man.
Also, try saying that you're "genuinely interested in finance" once you start plugging numbers into excel spreadsheets for 10 hours a day.

I'm very interested in eco and feel like I would enjoy it in uni but that's mostly why I chose to do comp sci instead. Problem I see with economics degrees is that who is actually hiring economists? Especially straight out of uni no experience economists I feel don't have many options.

An example of what I'm talking about is I know an IT company which has around 1000 people and they have 1 economist. How hard would it be to be that one economist who got that job? I think very hard - how many software developers do they have - hundreds and they are hiring devs who have not even finished uni to work full time. I might not know that much about ppl who have economics degrees and where they work but I think that when you consider how little demand there is for economists I personally wouldn't do it as my only option.

Maybe it could be something for a double degree like comp sci/economics or business/economics but I myself would not do business because I think it has a similar problem of not being able to show that you're better than other ppl and over saturation. Also with business you don't really learn how to make anything yourself whereas a soft dev could just write his own program, make a successful company and do whatever he needs without a business degree.
dude, I think you're overestimating the employment prospects of comp sci. It's really not that good. a lot of people probably end up in some boring admin role.

As for a soft dev starting up a company, that is very hard tbh. and writing a program is going to be such a huge opportunity cost that most of the time it's not worth it. otherwise everyone would be doing it.

of course, you can run a business without a business degree. Business degrees seem pretty useless tbh. any mathematician could probably learn the finance/accounting required for a job very quickly and better and any lawyer could probably do marketing and hr better than someone with a degree in those areas.

if you do actually plan on running a company, a law degree seems infinitely more useful. Regulations are the foremost barrier for starting a company in Australia imo.
 
Last edited:
  • Wow
Reactions: c8

#RoadTo31Atar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Messages
328
Gender
Undisclosed
HSC
2020
you boys need to understand something. career progression/money is inversely proportional to satisfaction/work-life balance. And that's assuming if you have the ability to actually enter a job where you can take that tradeoff in the first place.

"it's so popular these days but I'm genuinely interested in finance and economics" - this doesn't matter. Just average a 80+ WAM and you good. Not that hard when you consider that it is commerce, and not a STEM course. Now if you're averaging a 80+ WAM in physics, I respect you 10x more than a commerce man.
Also, try saying that you're "genuinely interested in finance" once you start plugging numbers into excel spreadsheets for 10 hours a day.


dude, I think you're overestimating the employment prospects of comp sci. It's really not that good. a lot of people probably end up in some boring admin role.

As for a soft dev starting up a company, that is very hard tbh. and writing a program is going to be such a huge opportunity cost that most of the time it's not worth it. otherwise everyone would be doing it.

of course, you can run a business without a business degree. Business degrees seem pretty useless tbh. any mathematician could probably learn the finance/accounting required for a job very quickly and better and any lawyer could probably do marketing and hr better than someone with a degree in those areas.

if you do actually plan on running a company, a law degree seems infinitely more useful. Regulations are the foremost barrier for starting a company in Australia imo.
I'm not overestimating the prospects of comp sci - it's a difficult field that requires logical thinking and constant learning. I can understand saying this like 40 years ago but today technology is literally everywhere and there is so much room for improvement/automation and maintenance of systems. A skilled soft developer will always be in demand and not need to end up in an admin role. Don't mean to be rude but I don't think you know anyone who is working in software development if you think it doesn't have good opportunity and most ppl end up in admin roles.

It is true that creating a startup has OC and is hard but I only used it as an example that if you want to - you can start a successful business without a business degree.

Sure a law degree is great but what is the OC of a law degree? You will spend about double the time in uni/education and have about double the debt. By the time your law degree is done you could have a large salary with a comp sci degree.
 

SylviaB

sorry if i offended anyone
Joined
Nov 26, 2008
Messages
6,337
Location
Lidcombe
Gender
Female
HSC
2021
I want money, but I also want other things like job satisfaction or any thing that can lever up my life (such as develop my perspectives)
what the actual fuck
 

[ ]

Active Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2019
Messages
157
Gender
Male
HSC
2020
what does it even mean
To develop my perspective means to gain experiences, real knowledge, mindsets or views about things that can indirectly help me in my life. (For example, reading a book about say, maybe Western Philosophy? develops your logical thinking, or say travelling throughout the world and get first hand experiences about the issues in the world widens your horizon, if this makes it clear)
 

c8

Active Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2018
Messages
218
Gender
Female
HSC
2020
To develop my perspective means to gain experiences, real knowledge, mindsets or views about things that can indirectly help me in my life. (For example, reading a book about say, maybe Western Philosophy? develops your logical thinking, or say travelling throughout the world and get first hand experiences about the issues in the world widens your horizon, if this makes it clear)
If you want these things bad enough then you can do it with almost any job. Plus, unless you're super interested in western philosophy and want to study it in uni, you could probably just read about it online.
 

[ ]

Active Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2019
Messages
157
Gender
Male
HSC
2020
If you want these things bad enough then you can do it with almost any job. Plus, unless you're super interested in western philosophy and want to study it in uni, you could probably just read about it online.
m8 that's just an example that I just came up with
 

[ ]

Active Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2019
Messages
157
Gender
Male
HSC
2020
I'm confused as to what you're even asking in this thread. Can you please clarify what your question is?
Arts and Social Science jobs that is high paying, good job growth or job prospective, high satisfaction and gives me the ability or mindset that I can use in my life. (I think this should make it more clear)
 
Last edited:

[ ]

Active Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2019
Messages
157
Gender
Male
HSC
2020
I'm confused as to what you're even asking in this thread. Can you please clarify what your question is?
I feel like I'm not making it clear enough so.. in terms of developing my perspective, I'm talking about resources that I can use to address issues in my life or lets me get into a higher social status and economic status. In terms of addressing issues in my life, perspectives, knowledge or mindsets can be useful because it tells me what should I think and how should I change etc etc. In terms of climbing up into a higher social or economic status.. well, think it like this. Say if I want to become a leader of a nation, it's always better for me to understand the economics, the society, the law, the politics or the history of the nation, by learning them, especially gaining first hand experiences it makes me more suitable to the job.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top