It’s not all about the ATAR (1 Viewer)

erucibon

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? where did you get this info from?
idk if it is true, but I was asking about in other forums like medstudentsonline when I wanted to do med before my hopes were crushed
 
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mmmm.

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True but like you can't get into uni with a crap ATAR.
You can, there are early entry schemes, and another scheme where some unis only require you to get a certain band in certain subjects, i.e. wsu true rewards, mq academic entry program , etc.
 

idkkdi

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idk if it is true, but I was asking about in other forums like medstudentsonline and ********* when I wanted to do med before my hopes were crushed
damn. so western Sydney med ain't worth shit?
 

c8

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apparently it does. that's why I'm asking erucibon.
It doesn't at all unless you're going overseas or maybe if you're interstate then it may a little but other than that it literally does not matter at all.
 

quickoats

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apparently it does. that's why I'm asking erucibon.
How many times have you asked your GP/any doctor you have visited what uni they studied at? Did this make you refuse their service?

All domestic grads have an equivalent degree so there’s no shame in going to WSU. Yes you might get clowned by your mates (UWS = U Went Shit) but the med degree is still a med degree. In Australia everything gets funnelled through the hospital anyway so you’ll be there for a while before you specialise.

In American it’s a different story because students “match” into a specialty at graduation (sadly some do not match at all).
 

Eagle Mum

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How many times have you asked your GP/any doctor you have visited what uni they studied at? Did this make you refuse their service?

All domestic grads have an equivalent degree so there’s no shame in going to WSU. Yes you might get clowned by your mates (UWS = U Went Shit) but the med degree is still a med degree. In Australia everything gets funnelled through the hospital anyway so you’ll be there for a while before you specialise.

In American it’s a different story because students “match” into a specialty at graduation (sadly some do not match at all).
Absolutely - all med degrees are essentially equal in Australia.
For those who are considering entering the profession, however, be prepared to study for many more years after getting your degree, because all the specialty colleges (including general practice to a certain extent) have rigorous training programs and high bars for passing. There are doctors who have spent 8-9 years training in their chosen specialty (ie. 26-29 years of formal study, training & exams from the beginning of their education) who don’t make the cut and have to settle for being career medical officers. Getting a high ATAR and an interview with a med school is just the first step of a very long journey.
 

Velocifire

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Absolutely - all med degrees are essentially equal in Australia.
For those who are considering entering the profession, however, be prepared to study for many more years after getting your degree, because all the specialty colleges (including general practice to a certain extent) have rigorous training programs and high bars for passing. There are doctors who have spent 8-9 years training in their chosen specialty (ie. 26-29 years of formal study, training & exams from the beginning of their education) who don’t make the cut and have to settle for being career medical officers. Getting a high ATAR and an interview with a med school is just the first step of a very long journey.
Yeah, I 100% agree with that. Getting into medicine is a mountain climb, only to climb a much higher mountain to survive once you're in.
 

dumNerd

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Absolutely - all med degrees are essentially equal in Australia.
For those who are considering entering the profession, however, be prepared to study for many more years after getting your degree, because all the specialty colleges (including general practice to a certain extent) have rigorous training programs and high bars for passing. There are doctors who have spent 8-9 years training in their chosen specialty (ie. 26-29 years of formal study, training & exams from the beginning of their education) who don’t make the cut and have to settle for being career medical officers. Getting a high ATAR and an interview with a med school is just the first step of a very long journey.
first and probably the hardest step
 

idkkdi

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first and probably the hardest step
tbh, that's probably true. The med course is not designed for only 0.5% of normal people to pass. But that is the requirement to enter, basically.
 
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Eagle Mum

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first and probably the hardest step
The first step IS hard because there are limited Uni places and a very competitive field, but specialist training programs also have limited places and there are doctors who’ve gotten into these programs, now in their thirties, working to support their families and studying between work, who’ve failed Part I or II exams several times already and facing their last chance(s) at entering the specialty they’ve dedicated many years of study, work & training. It’s a great profession for many, but it’s appropriate to realise that getting into a med school may not be the hardest part.
 

idkkdi

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The first step IS hard because there are limited Uni places and a very competitive field, but specialist training programs also have limited places and there are doctors who’ve gotten into these programs, now in their thirties, working to support their families and studying between work, who’ve failed Part I or II exams several times already and facing their last chance(s) at entering the specialty they’ve dedicated many years of study, work & training. It’s a great profession for many, but it’s appropriate to realise that getting into a med school may not be the hardest part.
the first step is not the hardest, yes. because all things get harder as you go deeper.

as a milestone for culling wannabes, i think it's the worst.
 

Eagle Mum

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the first step is not the hardest, yes. because all things get harder as you go deeper.

as a milestone for culling wannabes, i think it's the worst.
I think it is hard for many who think getting into med school is all about the ATAR mark, which is what we also thought a few years ago and the reason why my daughter, who went to a high school where nobody else wanted to do medicine, applied to every med school in the country which offered an undergrad course. It turns out that it’s mostly down to the interview and it seems the members of all the interview panels found her honest answers, coming from a background of a local nonselective school with no coaching ever in her life, a refreshing change (some actually told her that her answers were different and stood out), so she got offers from all her first choice universities in every state (ie. no rejections so we will never know if she did fail an interview in her lower choices). There was no parental or self-imposed pressure to get into medicine (although she did apply to every med school to give it a thorough shot and it was a good excuse to travel around Australia), so she was pretty relaxed for the interviews - we took the approach that if she didn’t get in, then she wasn’t meant to do medicine.
 
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