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PhD's and Postgraduate Studies. (1 Viewer)

AbsoluteValue

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Hey guys, I wanna do med/science or comm/adv. maths or science/eng or eng (civil + architecture) or adv. science or etc... but don't wanna get a job and work I just wanna keep studying till I have enough qualification to teach at university, I don't like working for other people! How long would that take? and do they pay me good money while I'm doing postgrad studies like PhD and research? and is it a good idea overall, to me it seems perfect.
 

Shadowdude

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If you want to work at a uni as a lecturer - you need a PhD, pretty much.

You'll need your undergrad, plus post grad stuff - and then your doctorate... it could take a while.
 

AbsoluteValue

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It should be fun doing PhD, even if it takes that long :) Better than working for someone.
Yeah, I think I wanna become a lecturer, you have any idea about how much they pay?
 

AbsoluteValue

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I don't know but on CareerOne, engineering management is like $250K per year, I thought this would be similar.
Specialised doctors get around $200K, so I was thinking it is close to that range.
Might do actuary/adv. maths then, heard they pay heaps there.
 

Survivor39

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AbsoluteValue, if a good salary is what you are looking for, then academia (teaching at university) is not for you, I'm afraid. A full Professor gets 150K p.a. so that's significantly lower than the figures you listed for the other professions. At the end of the day, if you enjoy your work (remember you don't work for someone when you are an academic), then money will be less of an issue!

So to answer your original question, you will need a bachelor degree with Honours, then this will allow you to progress straight to a PhD. Finish your PhD, and depend on your discipline, you may need additional training as a post-doctoral scholar (in science for example, you continue your research training in someone's lab). When you are confident you can "do it on your own", you apply for a faculty position and become an academic, and once that happens, you can now start running your own lab (in science at least). Overseas training might help getting a faculty position.
 

kfnmpah

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you also have to publish a paper maximum every 3 years to keep your spot as an academic at uni
 

viva_la_albert

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Hey guys, I wanna do med/science or comm/adv. maths or science/eng or eng (civil + architecture) or adv. science or etc... but don't wanna get a job and work I just wanna keep studying till I have enough qualification to teach at university, I don't like working for other people! How long would that take? and do they pay me good money while I'm doing postgrad studies like PhD and research? and is it a good idea overall, to me it seems perfect.
Before you look at PhD or anything else, you should consider what degree really you want to do. You've listed a broad range of degrees, if you've got your sights set on university lecturing, then you're going to have to pick a degree like Science or Engineering and do honours. Look at the universities around Australia and other distinct unis around the world, and google the lecturers. Alot of them have worked in industry or have been contracted to work with industry as part of their research group. You can't "not work for other people", if you want to do high impact science, it has to be with/for other people. From honours up to Post-doc, you'll be working for other people. The pay isn't very good in science unless you're working for industry (but if you work in industry, you'll definitely be working for others). I work as a research assistant in a lab and I can tell you how passionate scientists are for their field. They don't do it for the money.

Bottom line is, if you want good money, work in engineering. You're always going to be working for other people once you graduate. Theres a pecking order, jobs like engineering management are given to people who are both extremely qualified and extremely good at networking with their colleagues.
 

Moldy81

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Hi, To find out about how long it would take to complete a PhD, or for information on postgraduate research, contact the UWS Research Team on sa-research@uws.edu.au. Best regards, UWS Course Info
 

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