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NoSleep

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Just out of curiosity, what happens if you give two answers in the HSC, with the first one being correct and the second being wrong? For instance if the question asks for the equation as a function of y in terms of x, and the answer written down by the student has the equation in terms of x, but then after that the student has written it in terms of y, how does it get marked? Do they award marks to the first or second answer? Or do they just not award any marks at all?
 

catha230

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I believe I read somewhere or my teacher told me that in the actual HSC, if you have two separate sets of working out-answer then they are going to mark your first one only. However, what you describe is not quite like that but it seems like your final answer is the equation of x in terms of y while the answer asks for the opposite, then I’m afraid you’re going to get deducted mark but not much.
 

Trebla

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Your example doesn’t really describe having two answers with one “correct” and one “incorrect” because they are both technically correct, just expressed in different ways. Since there is no contradiction and the required expression (y in terms of x) is already given, you will get full marks.
 

catha230

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Your example doesn’t really describe having two answers with one “correct” and one “incorrect” because they are both technically correct, just expressed in different ways. Since there is no contradiction and the required expression (y in terms of x) is already given, you will get full marks.
I thought he said the question specifically asks "for the equation as a function of y in terms of x"? However, his final answer was in terms of y (the last line) the teacher might deduct mark, don't you think?
 

Trebla

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I thought he said the question specifically asks "for the equation as a function of y in terms of x"? However, his final answer was in terms of y (the last line) the teacher might deduct mark, don't you think?
In the HSC, the marking is always done with the benefit of the doubt given to the student. It is also done with the mindset of awarding marks, not deducting marks.

For example, if the student does the working leading up to the correct answer say:

<working>
y = x + 1
x = y - 1

then as far as the marker is concerned, the student has demonstrated the required knowledge to get to the correct answer y = x + 1.

The line x = y - 1 is seen as an unnecessary line that adds no value to gaining marks. It is not seen as “another answer”. Therefore, the student is awarded full marks.

The only time a “deduction” may occur is when there is a logical contradiction. For example, if the student gets y = x + 1 but also says y = x - 1 through an alternative method, but does not demonstrate which one is correct. This scenario is what I think the OP was more likely referring to.

Keep in mind, this is for HSC marking of the external exams. For internal assessments, teachers can enforce whatever marking criteria they want.
 

NoSleep

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In the HSC, the marking is always done with the benefit of the doubt given to the student. It is also done with the mindset of awarding marks, not deducting marks.

For example, if the student does the working leading up to the correct answer say:

<working>
y = x + 1
x = y - 1

then as far as the marker is concerned, the student has demonstrated the required knowledge to get to the correct answer y = x + 1.

The line x = y - 1 is seen as an unnecessary line that adds no value to gaining marks. It is not seen as “another answer”. Therefore, the student is awarded full marks.

The only time a “deduction” may occur is when there is a logical contradiction. For example, if the student gets y = x + 1 but also says y = x - 1 through an alternative method, but does not demonstrate which one is correct. This scenario is what I think the OP was more likely referring to.

Keep in mind, this is for HSC marking of the external exams. For internal assessments, teachers can enforce whatever marking criteria they want.
Yes that was the scenario I was referring to, makes sense thank you.
 

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