Struggling with geometry :(( (1 Viewer)

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IM STRUGGLING WITH GEOMETRY AAAAHHHH!!!

I've been doing some work on geometry (mostly triangle congruency/similarity proofs, finding lengths, angles etc.) for the past year or so both at school (in my 'competition maths' class) and at the tutoring college I go to.

The trouble is, I seem to never get the 'hang' of understanding what I'm doing.

I have trouble identifying when I should be using certain rules to answer questions with and I guess, in general, finding a direction as to how to solve the question at all. And in the end, geometry questions just end up overwhelming me and I just don't know what to do.

Example of question I have trouble with:

1627735358164.png

I feel like geometry doesn't come to me naturally like algebra - and I get that algebra is pretty straightforward most of the time so maybe that is why. But lately, geometry has got me so overwhelmed, I start hating maths and not wanting to do any maths at all. I feel like I'm falling behind in both my school maths comp class and my tutoring class and I feel like everyone else in my classes know exactly what they're doing and I'm just dumb and not meant for geometry.

I just want to know if there are any tips to overcoming the problems I'm experiencing with geometry (and hard high school maths in general) and how I can maybe start enjoying geometry.

Any help is desperately needed!

From, a struggling not-so-happy geometrician :(
 

DarkOperator618

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IM STRUGGLING WITH GEOMETRY AAAAHHHH!!!

I've been doing some work on geometry (mostly triangle congruency/similarity proofs, finding lengths, angles etc.) for the past year or so both at school (in my 'competition maths' class) and at the tutoring college I go to.

The trouble is, I seem to never get the 'hang' of understanding what I'm doing.

I have trouble identifying when I should be using certain rules to answer questions with and I guess, in general, finding a direction as to how to solve the question at all. And in the end, geometry questions just end up overwhelming me and I just don't know what to do.

Example of question I have trouble with:

View attachment 31343

I feel like geometry doesn't come to me naturally like algebra - and I get that algebra is pretty straightforward most of the time so maybe that is why. But lately, geometry has got me so overwhelmed, I start hating maths and not wanting to do any maths at all. I feel like I'm falling behind in both my school maths comp class and my tutoring class and I feel like everyone else in my classes know exactly what they're doing and I'm just dumb and not meant for geometry.

I just want to know if there are any tips to overcoming the problems I'm experiencing with geometry (and hard high school maths in general) and how I can maybe start enjoying geometry.

Any help is desperately needed!

From, a struggling not-so-happy geometrician :(
first off, wtf is this lol

this stuff isn't available in the maths advanced syllabus btw so you'll be fine (like HSC advanced maths)
idk about 3u
 

CM_Tutor

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@_caecilius_iucundum_

Firstly, are you a fan of Latin or of Dr Who? Just curious from the user name.

Second, most of the geometry has been removed from the year 11 and 12 syllabi. What is left will require formulae for areas and volumes, and occasionally a similarity / congruence needs to be recognised. It's a shame, really, geometry teaches some useful skills in setting out proofs.

Third, this is not a straight-forward geometry problem. I'll try to do a solution but I wanted to make these comments first. I also want to say that I am not certain that the question is complete. The line , for example, is given no definition other that it forming a side of two of the triangles. In other words, we know that divides into two triangles of equal area ( and ) and it appears that might be parallel to and that might be the midpoint of , but neither of those is certain from the information given. I make these observations to illustrate the kinds of thoughts / impressions that I have before attempting to solve the problem. I also note that the information that is isosceles does not actually specify which pair of sides is equal. Now, since is a right angle and so can't be a base angle, we do actually know that .

My final thought is that competition maths and high school maths are quite different. I found competition maths to be useful for developing skills for the more difficult exam questions where insight is required, but many of the problems are unlike any specific syllabus content.
 

Life'sHard

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Yup most geometry is gone from yr 11 and 12. However, some circle geo can be found in 4u and it's still important that you at least know the basics of some of these theorems. Also knowledge of parallelograms, kites, trapeziums etc and there properties (Intersection, bisections, parallel, equal bisection etc) is important.
 

Drongoski

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No, you're not necessarily struggling with Geometry. This question itself is not straightforward. I bet half of 2U Maths Advanced student will find this question hard.
 

Eagle Mum

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These are problem solving exercises - usually all the given information (words & diagrams) are relevant and the challenge is to work out what order to use the information.

1. The total area of 2016 cm^2 is divided into 7 equal triangles, so each triangle is 288 cm^2.

2. Triangle BIE comprises four of these smaller triangles, so its total area is 1152 cm^2.

3. Triangle BIE is isosceles so BI = BE = X (turning this into algebra); it’s also a right angle triangle with BE as its height (h) and BI as its base (b).

4. Since the formula for the area of a triangle is A = (b x h)/2, we substitute 1152 = (X^2)/2

5. Rearranging our equation: BE = BI = X = √2304 = 48

6. Area of HIE = (HI x BE)/2 = 288 Therefore, HI = 576 / 48 = 12

7. BH = BI - HI = 48 - 12 = 36

8. Area of BHD = (BH x BD)/2 = 576 Therefore, BD = 1152 / 36 = 32

9. Area of BGD = (BG x BD)/2 = 288 Therefore, BG = 576 / 32 = 18

Note that one of the crucial points to recognise in this question is that the common angle at B is a right angle, so equations can incorporate the areas of the different triangles (which are multiples of 288) to find the length of either the base or perpendicular height of individual triangles once the other has been determined and sequentially determine various lengths to arrive at the length of BG.
 
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CM_Tutor

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  • I've commented above on some first impressions.
  • I didn't comment that the only number we have here is an area, so we'll obviously need to be using the areas of the triangles
  • All seven small triangles have areas where using is straight-forward as, in each case, the base is on one side of the given right angled and the height is measured along the other.
  • I will start by giving the distance I seek a name, and introducing a pronumeral for the other side of , since I can then use the area formula for that triangle easily.

We seek the length , so let and let .

We have seven triangles, equal in area, with a total area of , and so the area of each is . Using this fact with gives


and, in gives


Now, we know that is isosceles and must be the apex angle, so . is made up of four of triangles of area 288 cm2 and so


So, we have shown that and, as , we can deduce that , and so we can examine the area of :

 

CM_Tutor

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And overall, we have distances:

, made up of , , and

and

, made up of , , and

Note that the diagram is quite misleading in some ways. does not appear to be double , nor to be longer than . My initial impression that is the midpoint of is correct, but trigonometry tells us that




and thus and are not parallel as their corresponding angles are not equal.
 

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