Are viruses considered a change in the chemical environment? (1 Viewer)

Fiction

Active Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2014
Messages
779
Gender
Undisclosed
HSC
2015
For the first dot point in blueprint of life "outline the impact on evolution....changes in chemical conditions in the environment"
I was thinking of doing rabbits and myxomatosis, but it's a virus and not a chemical.

Thank you in advance :)
 

BlueGas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2014
Messages
2,429
Gender
Male
HSC
N/A
I think it's honestly better if you use Mosquitoes and DDT as an example for chemical conditions in the environment.

Mosquitoes and DDT:

When DDT (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane) was first used as an insecticide to kill malarial mosquitoes, low concentrations were effective.
In subsequent doses, higher concentrations were needed and the sprayings became less effective.A select few from the population were naturally DDT-resistant that had survived, these then reproduced and passed on their resistance gene to their offspring, as a result the majority of the mosquito population is mainly resistant to DDT

OR you can use bent grass and heavy metal toxic waste as a different example, (whatever you find easiest to understand):

In mining areas of Wales, some areas of soil got contaminated by heavy metal waste. The bent grass grew in both the unpolluted and polluted areas. Over a number of generations, the populations on polluted areas became a whole different species.
 

BLIT2014

The pessimistic optimist.
Moderator
Joined
Jul 11, 2012
Messages
11,125
Location
In my head
Gender
Undisclosed
HSC
2014
Uni Grad
2018
I agree that for this dot point Mosquitos and DDT would probably be one of the better examples as BlueGas above me has said.
 

Fiction

Active Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2014
Messages
779
Gender
Undisclosed
HSC
2015
I think it's honestly better if you use Mosquitoes and DDT as an example for chemical conditions in the environment.

Mosquitoes and DDT:

When DDT (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane) was first used as an insecticide to kill malarial mosquitoes, low concentrations were effective.
In subsequent doses, higher concentrations were needed and the sprayings became less effective.A select few from the population were naturally DDT-resistant that had survived, these then reproduced and passed on their resistance gene to their offspring, as a result the majority of the mosquito population is mainly resistant to DDT

OR you can use bent grass and heavy metal toxic waste as a different example, (whatever you find easiest to understand):

In mining areas of Wales, some areas of soil got contaminated by heavy metal waste. The bent grass grew in both the unpolluted and polluted areas. Over a number of generations, the populations on polluted areas became a whole different species.
I agree that for this dot point Mosquitos and DDT would probably be one of the better examples as BlueGas above me has said.
lol thanks, I will :) Just trying to get out of remembering DDT's full name since the rabbit one sticks more easily in my brain for some reason haha
Repped~ "You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to BlueGas again."

On a side note, which textbook did you get the bent grass and heavy metal poisoning from, bluegas ?:)
 

BlueGas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2014
Messages
2,429
Gender
Male
HSC
N/A
lol thanks, I will :) Just trying to get out of remembering DDT's full name since the rabbit one sticks more easily in my brain for some reason haha
Repped~ "You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to BlueGas again."

On a side note, which textbook did you get the bent grass and heavy metal poisoning from, bluegas ?:)
From Ahmad Shah's notes.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top