Hardest Topic - New syllabus (1 Viewer)

blyatman

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Yeh I'd second that, some proofs questions I've seen are insanely difficult. However, given that it's a new topic, nobody knows the difficulty of the proof questions that will be turn up in the actual HSC. As a result, I think textbooks which have super difficult problems are merely covering their bases in case students get tested on some extremely difficult problems.
 

ewjfiwhelowaeoplg

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Vectors <= Mechanics < Integration < Complex Numbers <<<<<<< Proof

(Both the topics themselves and typical exam questions)
 
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Vectors <= Mechanics < Integration < Complex Numbers <<<<<<< Proof

(Both the topics themselves and typical exam questions)
Wouldnt be so sure vectors will be easy. Alot of material in textbooks is, but the actual stuff they put up is nothing like whats in the textbooks.
 

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HeroWise

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Someoen put insanely difficult proof question uwu
 

ewjfiwhelowaeoplg

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Yeah I think you are right.

Almost all hard vector questions will probably derive from this dot point:
  • prove geometric results in the plane and construct proofs in three dimensions
 

CM_Tutor

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You can be given vectors questions in projectiles that make things challenging
 

5uMath

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Wouldnt be so sure vectors will be easy. Alot of material in textbooks is, but the actual stuff they put up is nothing like whats in the textbooks.
Literally just substitue the line equation and solve for lambda in |v - c| = r for i, then for ii make a sphere of radius r and centre a, b, c, then use vector rules to find expressions for other points in the question, sub into the formula and prove that it equals 0.

Just tests the theory, not the application
 

mathsbrain

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Literally just substitue the line equation and solve for lambda in |v - c| = r for i, then for ii make a sphere of radius r and centre a, b, c, then use vector rules to find expressions for other points in the question, sub into the formula and prove that it equals 0.

Just tests the theory, not the application
can you show this in extended working please?
 

hschelper01

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I'd say - from what I've seen - the proof questions look like they are very challenging 🤷‍♂️ :rolleyes:
 

mathsbrain

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can someone show the working for part 3 of this question please? been stuck for a looooonnnnggg times lol
 

mathsbrain

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Hmm I fail to see how this hint helps with part (ii), are we talking about the same Sphere question that's on this page? Do you happen to have the link for the nesa sample link?
 

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