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How does Uni work? (1 Viewer)

varietyyy

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What happens after you receive your offers? Do you get multiple offers? After you choose what happens? How does UNI work? How is university structured? When are exams? How many exams/assignments do we have per year? What subjects do we choose? I am planning on doing CS btw.
 

Drdusk

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What happens after you receive your offers? Do you get multiple offers? After you choose what happens? How does UNI work? How is university structured? When are exams? How many exams/assignments do we have per year? What subjects do we choose? I am planning on doing CS btw.
Woah woah slow down there 😅

You get one offer and that's the highest preference that your eligible for. After you choose you should get an email from your uni with a little congratulations and what not from which it will direct you to a page to start your enrollment such as how your gonna pay your fees and setting up courses etc.

At Unsw were on a trimester system now so the usual is 3 subjects a term, in total 9 a year. Usually the finals are weighted heaps like all my finals have been at least 50% of the total mark. In Unsw CS so far has given me 2 assignments per course and for Maths you also usually get 1 assignment and 2 'midterm' tests and a final. The CS final is done on a computer where you live code to problems that they give you.

https://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/programs/2019/3778 will direct you to CS at Unsw(if your planning to do it there) and you pick a 'major' and it should pop up a bunch of courses under the sections level1, level2 etc.. You usually do level 1 courses first then level 2 etc.. however you don't always have to follow this rule, like I'm doing a second year course this term in my first year.

Uni is stressful at least Unsw has been quite stressful for me. Your expected to pick up things really fast so be prepared! =)
 

andrew12678

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You get one offer and that's the highest preference that your eligible for.
Just to expand on this, you get 1 offer per round. Rounds can be found here: https://www.uac.edu.au/key-dates . Once you get an offer from each round you can accept the offer, delete that preference and then set your preferences up to receive the second offer that you want in the second round and so on (for as many rounds as there are, in my year there were 4 in total and I played around with it for fun and got 4 different offers). Even though you've "accepted" an offer on UAC nothing is official until you "enrol" through the uni (and provide bank details for HECs etc) so you can most definitely accept multiple offers (to ensure they don't lapse) and then enroll later. And just like Drdusk said, you receive the highest preference you are eligible for (this also means no offer if you don't qualify for any of your preferences) so choose your preferences strategically.

p.s. I do CS as well so good choice
 

varietyyy

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Woah woah slow down there 😅

You get one offer and that's the highest preference that your eligible for. After you choose you should get an email from your uni with a little congratulations and what not from which it will direct you to a page to start your enrollment such as how your gonna pay your fees and setting up courses etc.

At Unsw were on a trimester system now so the usual is 3 subjects a term, in total 9 a year. Usually the finals are weighted heaps like all my finals have been at least 50% of the total mark. In Unsw CS so far has given me 2 assignments per course and for Maths you also usually get 1 assignment and 2 'midterm' tests and a final. The CS final is done on a computer where you live code to problems that they give you.

will direct you to CS at Unsw(if your planning to do it there) and you pick a 'major' and it should pop up a bunch of courses under the sections level1, level2 etc.. You usually do level 1 courses first then level 2 etc.. however you don't always have to follow this rule, like I'm doing a second year course this term in my first year.

Uni is stressful at least Unsw has been quite stressful for me. Your expected to pick up things really fast so be prepared! =)
Thanks for the reply!
Your last point scares me, I am kind of a slow learner (well more so an independent learner). I tend to learn better by myself in my own environment. In class I often don't understand concepts but once I read the textbook/watch a few YouTube videos on the topic I understand the concept well, not sure why this is. I believe I am capable of learning harder concepts, just takes me longer unfortunately. This is why I didn't do 4U maths which is another reason why I am rethinking doing CS. How math heavy is the CS degree anyways? I've been told that it is basically a maths degree where the maths is focused predominantly on the working of computers. I don't mind doing maths, but I don't really want to do a maths degree lol. Is Software Engineering better for this, I heard it is more focused on the engineering aspect of how code can be applied etc (I know it is also maths heavy which is fine). Is software engineering more broad and focused more on just the maths behind how computers work? Sorry if nothing I said above makes sense.
 

varietyyy

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Just to expand on this, you get 1 offer per round. Rounds can be found here: Once you get an offer from each round you can accept the offer, delete that preference and then set your preferences up to receive the second offer that you want in the second round and so on (for as many rounds as there are, in my year there were 4 in total and I played around with it for fun and got 4 different offers). Even though you've "accepted" an offer on UAC nothing is official until you "enrol" through the uni (and provide bank details for HECs etc) so you can most definitely accept multiple offers (to ensure they don't lapse) and then enroll later. And just like Drdusk said, you receive the highest preference you are eligible for (this also means no offer if you don't qualify for any of your preferences) so choose your preferences strategically.

p.s. I do CS as well so good choice
Hi, Thanks for your reply!
Do you get the offers the day the ATARS are releases or is there a period that you can change your preferences?
 

Skuxxgolfer

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Woah woah slow down there 😅

You get one offer and that's the highest preference that your eligible for. After you choose you should get an email from your uni with a little congratulations and what not from which it will direct you to a page to start your enrollment such as how your gonna pay your fees and setting up courses etc.

At Unsw were on a trimester system now so the usual is 3 subjects a term, in total 9 a year. Usually the finals are weighted heaps like all my finals have been at least 50% of the total mark. In Unsw CS so far has given me 2 assignments per course and for Maths you also usually get 1 assignment and 2 'midterm' tests and a final. The CS final is done on a computer where you live code to problems that they give you.

https://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/programs/2019/3778 will direct you to CS at Unsw(if your planning to do it there) and you pick a 'major' and it should pop up a bunch of courses under the sections level1, level2 etc.. You usually do level 1 courses first then level 2 etc.. however you don't always have to follow this rule, like I'm doing a second year course this term in my first year.

Uni is stressful at least Unsw has been quite stressful for me. Your expected to pick up things really fast so be prepared! =)
I hear the trimesters can be pretty bad, what is your opinion of this system?
 

Drdusk

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Thanks for the reply!
Your last point scares me, I am kind of a slow learner (well more so an independent learner). I tend to learn better by myself in my own environment. In class I often don't understand concepts but once I read the textbook/watch a few YouTube videos on the topic I understand the concept well, not sure why this is. I believe I am capable of learning harder concepts, just takes me longer unfortunately. This is why I didn't do 4U maths which is another reason why I am rethinking doing CS. How math heavy is the CS degree anyways? I've been told that it is basically a maths degree where the maths is focused predominantly on the working of computers. I don't mind doing maths, but I don't really want to do a maths degree lol. Is Software Engineering better for this, I heard it is more focused on the engineering aspect of how code can be applied etc (I know it is also maths heavy which is fine). Is software engineering more broad and focused more on just the maths behind how computers work? Sorry if nothing I said above makes sense.
Well whoever told you is basically a math degree is just talking crap lol, it's far from it. Either way going to Unsw or Usyd your expected to pick up things really fast. If you feel as though this might be an issue you should try it out first and then if you are struggling transfer to Uts. They go much slower(from what I've seen from a mate who did the same into to prog course as me but at Uts) and it's a pretty good uni as well.

You really only need to take 3 math classes for CS lol. The first two are your normal first year classes that everyone in Stem takes and the third one is Discrete Mathematics which can be a bit challenging. Yeah it's far from a math degree though...


I hear the trimesters can be pretty bad, what is your opinion of this system?
Not THAT bad imo. Most of us first years aren't really complaining that much, it's just the older students who've become so used to Semesters.
 

varietyyy

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Anyone know the difference between Software Engineering and Computer Science? I see that most people who work as Software Engineers have a computer science degree.
 

Drdusk

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Anyone know the difference between Software Engineering and Computer Science? I see that most people who work as Software Engineers have a computer science degree.
Soft Eng focuses solely on developing perfect software that meets users needs. It therefore requires you to do boring af courses such as Software construction and programming and ethics where you will learn about the users needs and all that bs. Computer Science skips all that boring stuff and just solely focuses on teaching you advanced programming.

Comp Sci at Unsw also has it's own set of majors as opposed to Soft engi which doesn't. With CS you can major in a wide range of disciplines, all while taking the same programming courses as soft engi and even more advanced ones, so I recommend CS. It's also one year less.
 

varietyyy

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Soft Eng focuses solely on developing perfect software that meets users needs. It therefore requires you to do boring af courses such as Software construction and programming and ethics where you will learn about the users needs and all that bs. Computer Science skips all that boring stuff and just solely focuses on teaching you advanced programming.

Comp Sci at Unsw also has it's own set of majors as opposed to Soft engi which doesn't. With CS you can major in a wide range of disciplines, all while taking the same programming courses as soft engi and even more advanced ones, so I recommend CS. It's also one year less.
Again, thanks for the reply!
 

sida1049

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Thanks for the reply!
Your last point scares me, I am kind of a slow learner (well more so an independent learner). I tend to learn better by myself in my own environment. In class I often don't understand concepts but once I read the textbook/watch a few YouTube videos on the topic I understand the concept well, not sure why this is. I believe I am capable of learning harder concepts, just takes me longer unfortunately. This is why I didn't do 4U maths which is another reason why I am rethinking doing CS. How math heavy is the CS degree anyways? I've been told that it is basically a maths degree where the maths is focused predominantly on the working of computers. I don't mind doing maths, but I don't really want to do a maths degree lol. Is Software Engineering better for this, I heard it is more focused on the engineering aspect of how code can be applied etc (I know it is also maths heavy which is fine). Is software engineering more broad and focused more on just the maths behind how computers work? Sorry if nothing I said above makes sense.
Actually, I want to add that maths is very, very important to comp sci. While a major in comp sci isn't equivalent to a major in maths, when you get to the more theoretical comp sci courses (third year stuff), it will look pretty much 100% like maths. And sometimes it isn't just using maths you already know - you're being taught new maths in these comp sci courses that don't even appear in maths courses. So by the time you complete your comp sci major, you are expected to be someone who has a decent background in the kind of maths that appear in comp sci, and be ready to pick up more advanced maths concepts on the go.

That said, I think that a comp sci education should generally prepare you for this fairly well - you're required to take some amount of maths units, and you'll definitely be shown maths on the go in comp sci courses when you need them. Being a slow learner is no problem at all, as long as you're independent. If you're willing to sit down and think on abstract concepts for as long as it takes until you get it, then a comp sci major should be no problem for you. This applies to everything at uni, not just maths - you will eventually get used to being introduced to new ideas and pick up things on the go.

I personally think that if you're someone who is interested in real comp sci shit - the theoretical, mathematical stuff, then comp sci is definitely the way to go. Otherwise, a software engineering degree is just fine if your end goal is to obtain a practical programming role. (And of course, you can always transfer mid-way.)

Edit: I should probs add a disclaimer that there is wriggle room for choice in a comp sci major, so of course one could try to minimise the number of theoretical comp sci units they take to minimise the maths in their degree. However, keep in mind that there will still be a fair degree of maths you will encounter, and if you're considering honours/postgrad, then you should be actively seeking out more exposure to the maths heavy stuff.
 
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Time&moretime

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Woah woah slow down there 😅

You get one offer and that's the highest preference that your eligible for. After you choose you should get an email from your uni with a little congratulations and what not from which it will direct you to a page to start your enrollment such as how your gonna pay your fees and setting up courses etc.

At Unsw were on a trimester system now so the usual is 3 subjects a term, in total 9 a year. Usually the finals are weighted heaps like all my finals have been at least 50% of the total mark. In Unsw CS so far has given me 2 assignments per course and for Maths you also usually get 1 assignment and 2 'midterm' tests and a final. The CS final is done on a computer where you live code to problems that they give you.

https://www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate/programs/2019/3778 will direct you to CS at Unsw(if your planning to do it there) and you pick a 'major' and it should pop up a bunch of courses under the sections level1, level2 etc.. You usually do level 1 courses first then level 2 etc.. however you don't always have to follow this rule, like I'm doing a second year course this term in my first year.

Uni is stressful at least Unsw has been quite stressful for me. Your expected to pick up things really fast so be prepared! =)
Quick question, if in the December rounds you get your second UAC preference, you then accept & then delete? Then in January you get your first UAC preference, do you then accept therefore the one you accepted back in December gets withdrawn automatically ?
 

sida1049

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Yeaaaaah..... well I mean it's really similar to discrete maths, it's not like your taking any advanced differential equation or analysis classes for Cs.
Definitely not, but it's still maths. Although I will say, I personally had a much easier time in analysis (even measure theory) than this comp sci course, which is just maths but a different kind, but maybe that's just me
 

andrew12678

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Hi, Thanks for your reply!
Do you get the offers the day the ATARS are releases or is there a period that you can change your preferences?
From my experience, you get the ATAR and then there's a few days or two to "update your preferences" for the first round.
 

BLIT2014

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Macquarie Uni has Semesters .
I’ll be talking specifically like Macquarie.
Typically we have 12-13 weeks of content with actual classes/lectures and course content. After week 13 we go straight to our exam period which is a month roughly.

We have a midsem “break” about week7 that goes for two weeks where tutorials and lectures are not on. It is possible to have assignments due on this period .
 

pikachu975

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Thanks for the reply!
Your last point scares me, I am kind of a slow learner (well more so an independent learner). I tend to learn better by myself in my own environment. In class I often don't understand concepts but once I read the textbook/watch a few YouTube videos on the topic I understand the concept well, not sure why this is. I believe I am capable of learning harder concepts, just takes me longer unfortunately. This is why I didn't do 4U maths which is another reason why I am rethinking doing CS. How math heavy is the CS degree anyways? I've been told that it is basically a maths degree where the maths is focused predominantly on the working of computers. I don't mind doing maths, but I don't really want to do a maths degree lol. Is Software Engineering better for this, I heard it is more focused on the engineering aspect of how code can be applied etc (I know it is also maths heavy which is fine). Is software engineering more broad and focused more on just the maths behind how computers work? Sorry if nothing I said above makes sense.
Don’t worry about learning slowly that’s me too! I can’t understand things until I do questions to practice it. Independent learning is really useful for uni imo since it’s more self guided than in high school. And honestly learning slow is fine, in my opinion the uni workload is less than high school since in high school you have like 5+ subjects AND you have 7 hours of school 5 days a week. I guess uni work IS harder but if you do consistent work there’s much more free time in my opinion. Uni it’s much easier to procrastinate though since you don’t “get in trouble” by the teachers which is why it can feel like a heavy workload at times.
 

varietyyy

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Don’t worry about learning slowly that’s me too! I can’t understand things until I do questions to practice it. Independent learning is really useful for uni imo since it’s more self guided than in high school. And honestly learning slow is fine, in my opinion the uni workload is less than high school since in high school you have like 5+ subjects AND you have 7 hours of school 5 days a week. I guess uni work IS harder but if you do consistent work there’s much more free time in my opinion. Uni it’s much easier to procrastinate though since you don’t “get in trouble” by the teachers which is why it can feel like a heavy workload at times.
This is very reassuring thanks!! I think the fact that Uni costs heaps of $$$, I will be inclined to work harder and procrastinate less. :D
 

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