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HSC 2016 General Maths Marathon (1 Viewer)

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InteGrand

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what a random question lol
the 'trick' is that super isnt really a deduction?
You deduct everything.

I realised davidgoes4wce didn't write his deduction of super, but the final answer he got includes this deduction (so he probably just forgot to type the super amount, i.e. typo).
 

davidgoes4wce

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You deduct everything.

I realised davidgoes4wce didn't write his deduction of super, but the final answer he got includes this deduction (so he probably just forgot to type the super amount, i.e. typo).
I fixed it up. I do have a background in accounting but working out what is tax-deductible and non-deductible items has never been my strong point.
 

BLIT2014

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anyone can explain the step by step in order to get to this answer
Interest borrowed:
I=P*r*n (Simple interest formula)
=14500*13.5%*3
=5872.5

Total amount borrowed
=Principle+interest
=14500+5872.50
=$20372.5

Loan Insurance
115*3=$345


Months in 3 years : 36


Monthly Payment =($20372.5+$437.50+$345) divided by 36
=$576.527777778

I did this but it doesn't get the answer in the book.
 

davidgoes4wce

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I didn't understand this question from the Year 11 Oxford Book, (Q11)

I know that the median is half of the total frequency of scores, so I looked for the 55th score. My choice would have been then to work out the centre score of the 12-3pm interval, as this is where the 55th score lies. So technically, I would have had 1.30pm as my answer.

The books answer is: A
 

davidgoes4wce

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Now I have a table from my notes last year:

PERCENTAGE ERROR









Now I'm not sure if those notes if that is referring to percentages or not.

What would be your guys response to that Multiple Choice Question?
 

InteGrand

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Now I have a table from my notes last year:

PERCENTAGE ERROR









Now I'm not sure if those notes if that is referring to percentages or not.

What would be your guys response to that Multiple Choice Question?
Those notes aren't referring to percentage error, they're essentially referring to implied absolute error (half the limit of reading). So to get the percentage error, we would divide these by the measured value (200 mm for the question at hand).

By the way, for your notes on Error, they should say like ±0.5 m, i.e. include the units of the measurement (so if the measurement is in mm or kg, the absolute error is also in mm or kg). This is because these are absolute errors, e.g. how many metres we would be off by. This'll also help you remember that these errors are indeed absolute errors. Percentage errors on the other hand have no units (since they are just percentages like 1% error etc.) since the units cancel out when we divide.
 

davidgoes4wce

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Those notes aren't referring to percentage error, they're essentially referring to implied absolute error (half the limit of reading). So to get the percentage error, we would divide these by the measured value (200 mm for the question at hand).

By the way, for your notes on Error, they should say like ±0.5 m, i.e. include the units of the measurement (so if the measurement is in mm or kg, the absolute error is also in mm or kg). This is because these are absolute errors, e.g. how many metres we would be off by. This'll also help you remember that these errors are indeed absolute errors. Percentage errors on the other hand have no units (since they are just percentages like 1% error etc.) since the units cancel out when we divide.
The answer is D but im not 100% sure why it is.

So I guess after what you say there



I still don't get how they get to as their answer.
 
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davidgoes4wce

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Also the question where I got this , they had the question prior wrong for the radial survey, that's why I am having an open mind with these questions because I'm not sure if these markers marked it correctly or not.
 

davidgoes4wce

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This is an example I found online :

How To Find Percent Error: To correctly put together the percent error equation, take the difference from accepted value which is also your result minus the accepted value, divide by accepted value and multiply this result by 100. This formula is always expressed as %.
Example How To Calculate Percent Error: You estimated your monthly car payment to be $315. The actual car payment turned out to be $300. Calculate the percent error in these payments: First, take 315 and subtract 300 = 15. Next, take 15 and divide by the correct monthly car payment. 15/300=0.05. Finally, multiply 0.05 by 100=5%. The final percent error in your car payment estimate equals 5%.
 

davidgoes4wce

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Those notes aren't referring to percentage error, they're essentially referring to implied absolute error (half the limit of reading). So to get the percentage error, we would divide these by the measured value (200 mm for the question at hand).

By the way, for your notes on Error, they should say like ±0.5 m, i.e. include the units of the measurement (so if the measurement is in mm or kg, the absolute error is also in mm or kg). This is because these are absolute errors, e.g. how many metres we would be off by. This'll also help you remember that these errors are indeed absolute errors. Percentage errors on the other hand have no units (since they are just percentages like 1% error etc.) since the units cancel out when we divide.

 

InteGrand

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The answer is D but im not 100% sure why it is.

So I guess after what you say there



I still don't get how they get to as their answer.
Since it's +/- 0.5 mm, the total uncertainty in the reading is 1 mm, so the answer is whatever 1 mm is as a percentage of 200 mm, which is 0.5%.
 

InteGrand

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Actually realised it said +/- 0.5%. In the case of +/-, I reckon the +/- 0.25% is more correct. This would be because measuring to the nearest millimetre means that the measurement is 200 mm +/- 0.5 mm. So the error should be +/- 0.25%. Maybe General Maths has some formula for these Q's that dictates otherwise.
 
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