why is English compulsory? (1 Viewer)

whozathangin

New Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2024
Messages
3
Location
Perth WA
Gender
Male
HSC
2025
I get why its needed up to year 10 as a core subject to prepare students if they want to continue it, but after that it just drags out and you don't really learn much that's useful in the grand scheme of things other than to overanalyse texts. id also much rather using that subject slot for another class like chem which I couldn't change because it runs at the same time as music.
 

gmenoza

Member
Joined
May 30, 2023
Messages
88
Location
Xiao Ping, China
Gender
Male
HSC
2025
The continuation of English as a compulsory subject beyond Year 10 and up to the Higher School Certificate (HSC) in Australia serves several purposes, even though it might seem repetitive or unnecessary to some students:

  1. Foundational Literacy and Communication Skills: English is not just about analyzing texts; it's about mastering the fundamental skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. These skills are essential for navigating the complexities of modern life, from understanding legal documents to composing emails and reports in the workplace.
  2. Cultural and Societal Integration: English serves as a common language that binds diverse communities together in Australia. By ensuring proficiency in English, the education system promotes inclusivity and social cohesion, enabling individuals from different backgrounds to communicate effectively and participate fully in society.
  3. Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving: While it's true that some aspects of English study may seem disconnected from real-world applications, the skills developed through analyzing texts—such as critical thinking, inference, and interpretation—are highly transferable. These skills are invaluable in fields beyond literature, including science, business, and politics, where the ability to analyze complex information and make informed decisions is paramount.
  4. Cultural Literacy and Global Citizenship: English literature exposes students to a diverse range of perspectives, cultures, and historical contexts. By studying literature from different time periods and regions, students gain insights into the human experience across time and space, fostering empathy, tolerance, and global awareness.
  5. Preparation for Lifelong Learning: Beyond the immediate goals of academic achievement and employment, English education cultivates a love of learning and a curiosity about the world. By engaging with literature, students develop a lifelong habit of reading for pleasure and intellectual growth, which can enrich their lives in countless ways beyond the classroom.
In essence, English remains compulsory not only for its practical utility but also for its role in shaping well-rounded individuals who are equipped with the skills, knowledge, and values necessary to thrive in an increasingly interconnected and complex world.


Shakespeare's works are often a central component of English studies, particularly at the HSC level, for several reasons:

  1. Literary Significance: William Shakespeare is widely regarded as one of the greatest playwrights and poets in the English language. His works, including plays such as "Hamlet," "Macbeth," and "Romeo and Juliet," are celebrated for their depth of characterization, complexity of themes, and mastery of language. Studying Shakespeare allows students to engage with some of the most enduring and influential works of literature in human history.
  2. Cultural Heritage: Shakespeare's plays are an integral part of the English literary canon and have had a profound impact on literature, theater, and the arts worldwide. By studying Shakespeare, students gain an appreciation for the cultural heritage of the English-speaking world and its enduring influence on literature, language, and society.
  3. Language Proficiency: Shakespeare's language, though sometimes challenging for modern readers, is rich, poetic, and full of nuance. Engaging with Shakespeare's texts helps students develop their vocabulary, comprehension skills, and fluency in English, as well as an appreciation for the power and beauty of language.
  4. Exploration of Universal Themes: Despite being written centuries ago, Shakespeare's works continue to resonate with audiences today because of their exploration of universal themes such as love, power, ambition, betrayal, and the complexities of the human condition. Studying Shakespeare allows students to reflect on timeless questions and dilemmas that are relevant to their own lives and experiences.
  5. Development of Critical Thinking: Shakespeare's plays are open to multiple interpretations and often provoke lively debate and discussion. Analyzing Shakespeare's texts encourages students to think critically, question assumptions, and consider different perspectives, fostering intellectual curiosity and analytical skills that are essential for academic and personal growth.
While studying Shakespeare may initially seem daunting or irrelevant to some students, the depth and richness of his works offer valuable opportunities for exploration, discovery, and learning that extend far beyond the confines of the classroom.
 

whozathangin

New Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2024
Messages
3
Location
Perth WA
Gender
Male
HSC
2025
The continuation of English as a compulsory subject beyond Year 10 and up to the Higher School Certificate (HSC) in Australia serves several purposes, even though it might seem repetitive or unnecessary to some students:

  1. Foundational Literacy and Communication Skills: English is not just about analyzing texts; it's about mastering the fundamental skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. These skills are essential for navigating the complexities of modern life, from understanding legal documents to composing emails and reports in the workplace.
  2. Cultural and Societal Integration: English serves as a common language that binds diverse communities together in Australia. By ensuring proficiency in English, the education system promotes inclusivity and social cohesion, enabling individuals from different backgrounds to communicate effectively and participate fully in society.
  3. Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving: While it's true that some aspects of English study may seem disconnected from real-world applications, the skills developed through analyzing texts—such as critical thinking, inference, and interpretation—are highly transferable. These skills are invaluable in fields beyond literature, including science, business, and politics, where the ability to analyze complex information and make informed decisions is paramount.
  4. Cultural Literacy and Global Citizenship: English literature exposes students to a diverse range of perspectives, cultures, and historical contexts. By studying literature from different time periods and regions, students gain insights into the human experience across time and space, fostering empathy, tolerance, and global awareness.
  5. Preparation for Lifelong Learning: Beyond the immediate goals of academic achievement and employment, English education cultivates a love of learning and a curiosity about the world. By engaging with literature, students develop a lifelong habit of reading for pleasure and intellectual growth, which can enrich their lives in countless ways beyond the classroom.
In essence, English remains compulsory not only for its practical utility but also for its role in shaping well-rounded individuals who are equipped with the skills, knowledge, and values necessary to thrive in an increasingly interconnected and complex world.


Shakespeare's works are often a central component of English studies, particularly at the HSC level, for several reasons:

  1. Literary Significance: William Shakespeare is widely regarded as one of the greatest playwrights and poets in the English language. His works, including plays such as "Hamlet," "Macbeth," and "Romeo and Juliet," are celebrated for their depth of characterization, complexity of themes, and mastery of language. Studying Shakespeare allows students to engage with some of the most enduring and influential works of literature in human history.
  2. Cultural Heritage: Shakespeare's plays are an integral part of the English literary canon and have had a profound impact on literature, theater, and the arts worldwide. By studying Shakespeare, students gain an appreciation for the cultural heritage of the English-speaking world and its enduring influence on literature, language, and society.
  3. Language Proficiency: Shakespeare's language, though sometimes challenging for modern readers, is rich, poetic, and full of nuance. Engaging with Shakespeare's texts helps students develop their vocabulary, comprehension skills, and fluency in English, as well as an appreciation for the power and beauty of language.
  4. Exploration of Universal Themes: Despite being written centuries ago, Shakespeare's works continue to resonate with audiences today because of their exploration of universal themes such as love, power, ambition, betrayal, and the complexities of the human condition. Studying Shakespeare allows students to reflect on timeless questions and dilemmas that are relevant to their own lives and experiences.
  5. Development of Critical Thinking: Shakespeare's plays are open to multiple interpretations and often provoke lively debate and discussion. Analyzing Shakespeare's texts encourages students to think critically, question assumptions, and consider different perspectives, fostering intellectual curiosity and analytical skills that are essential for academic and personal growth.
While studying Shakespeare may initially seem daunting or irrelevant to some students, the depth and richness of his works offer valuable opportunities for exploration, discovery, and learning that extend far beyond the confines of the classroom.
I can communicate, read, write etc. just fine in the English language and I'm thinking of going into STEM or theatre, which I can study Shakespeare in my own time or in a separate arts curriculum. I'm very capable of problem solving because you use all those skills listed in subjects that can cover. I can speak and understand English fluently??? Also English as a subject is one of the reasons I stopped reading for my own good, it sucks the joy out of it by writing yapatron analytic essays on good books.
 

jimmysmith560

Le Phénix Trilingue
Moderator
Joined
Aug 22, 2019
Messages
4,207
Location
Krak des Chevaliers
Gender
Male
HSC
2019
Uni Grad
2022
It is normal for a country's native language subject to be compulsory, especially at senior school level. Unlike systems in other countries, the HSC offers significant flexibility in terms of subject selection. Other systems may not only make the native language subject mandatory, but also other subjects (such as maths). Of course, this is merely a comparison between the HSC and equivalent qualifications in other countries. With that being said, your comments regarding subject combination are definitely understandable, and such issues are experienced by many students, some of which can be addressed, while others sadly might not.

The reason that HSC English is compulsory is that it equips students with a writing ability in English that is superior to that at Stage 5 level, which is necessary, particularly for students who wish to study at university. While it is unlikely that you will be analysing texts in a literary manner (unless you specifically study a degree where this is relevant, which may or may not apply to you given your reply), you will likely need to interpret complex written material and communicate knowledge formally as part of your studies (for example, through reports and essays), the foundation for which is gained through your studies of English at Stage 6 level. While I suspect that gmenoza's response is AI-generated (I apologise if it is not), the notions of "language proficiency" and "development of critical thinking" are indeed important.

I hope this helps! :D
 

liamkk112

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2022
Messages
741
Gender
Female
HSC
2023
I get why its needed up to year 10 as a core subject to prepare students if they want to continue it, but after that it just drags out and you don't really learn much that's useful in the grand scheme of things other than to overanalyse texts. id also much rather using that subject slot for another class like chem which I couldn't change because it runs at the same time as music.
i hate to admit it but english has actually been helpful at uni for me, imagine if u didn’t write an essay for 2 years straight and then at uni u have to write a 12 paragraph essay. yes it’s not in the exact same style as i had to write in during hsc english, but generally i would say that my ability to write improved during hsc english, and the variety of styles you were forced to write and read in (discursive, essay style, short response) actually helped me a lot as i can understand writing from a variety of sources easier. for example, i can look at scientific literature (which by the way is completely dismissed by every main science subject lol) and be able to decode wtf is happening, just like what u have to do in the short response of hsc english. same for textbooks with a bunch of gibberish. as much as i hate hsc english it does actually teach some valuable skills lol, it can be argued that other subjects also teach those skills but overall it’s a necessary evil imo
 

HazzRat

H̊ͯaͤz͠z̬̼iẻͩ̊͏̖͈̪
Joined
Aug 29, 2021
Messages
1,093
Gender
Male
HSC
2024
If I were dictator of NSW, I would force the kids to do at least one humanity (like English, modern history, legal studies, economics, etc) to prove they can write essays. Forcing everyone to do English is just rough imo.
 

carrotsss

New Member
Joined
May 7, 2022
Messages
4,768
Gender
Male
HSC
2023
i hate to admit it but english has actually been helpful at uni for me, imagine if u didn’t write an essay for 2 years straight and then at uni u have to write a 12 paragraph essay
damn what uni subject have you needed to do that for
 

synthesisFR

しゃけ
Joined
Oct 28, 2022
Messages
4,307
Location
Getting deported
Gender
Male
HSC
2023
intro to science thingy lol
probably won’t have to do much more writing aside from lab reports after this tho
whats ur degree why r u doing scince i thought ur doing maths

if I could pick my majors again I would major in English tbvh
shame you don't get much of a career studying English
but for u since ur doing dent postgrad u couldve easily still done undergrad bach arts with english tho right
 

scaryshark09

∞∆ who let 'em cook dis long ∆∞
Joined
Oct 20, 2022
Messages
1,922
Gender
Undisclosed
HSC
1999
i hate to admit it but english has actually been helpful at uni for me, imagine if u didn’t write an essay for 2 years straight and then at uni u have to write a 12 paragraph essay. yes it’s not in the exact same style as i had to write in during hsc english, but generally i would say that my ability to write improved during hsc english, and the variety of styles you were forced to write and read in (discursive, essay style, short response) actually helped me a lot as i can understand writing from a variety of sources easier. for example, i can look at scientific literature (which by the way is completely dismissed by every main science subject lol) and be able to decode wtf is happening, just like what u have to do in the short response of hsc english. same for textbooks with a bunch of gibberish. as much as i hate hsc english it does actually teach some valuable skills lol, it can be argued that other subjects also teach those skills but overall it’s a necessary evil imo
you have to write essays for ur math degree?!?
i dont think ill ever have to write an essay again 🥳
 
Joined
Aug 17, 2020
Messages
1,599
Location
🇵🇸
Gender
Male
HSC
2020
whats ur degree why r u doing scince i thought ur doing maths


but for u since ur doing dent postgrad u couldve easily still done undergrad bach arts with english tho right
I did b. science but ur right I coulDVE*** majored or at least minored in english or anything I was actually interested in
just saying if I could do it again I'd prob take english for fun ☺
 
Last edited:

nitto

Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2023
Messages
43
Location
New South Wales
Gender
Male
HSC
2024
I get why its needed up to year 10 as a core subject to prepare students if they want to continue it, but after that it just drags out and you don't really learn much that's useful in the grand scheme of things other than to overanalyse texts. id also much rather using that subject slot for another class like chem which I couldn't change because it runs at the same time as music.
a lot of people get caught up in the whole analysing texts part, but those are honestly just building your skills. in the bigger picture, it's highly useful for conversations, deep insightful thought and honestly it's the one subject that teaches you how to write a good paper, especially for sciences, humanities etc. its definitely not perfect or anything but you're definitely better off learning how to think analytically, structure responses, develop oratory/social skills beyond a year 10 level.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top